Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A word, especially a noun in Indo-European linguistics, whose stem ends in /u/.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • OIr melo acts as a **u-stem** genitive and absolutely nothing like the original genitive **mlitós, while milis 'sweet' being a separate word shouldn't contaminate our assessment of 'honey'.

    Missing honey

  • And you clearly don't know anything about Old Irish; the genitive of /all/ i-stems is refashioned after the u-stem nouns.

    My sweet honey bee

  • You never bothered reading Douglas/Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, p.271 under *mélit: "... while OIr mil gen. melo is an i-stem, analogically refashioned after the u-stem 'mead'."

    My sweet honey bee

  • Ethan Osten: "And you clearly don't know anything about Old Irish; the genitive of /all/ i-stems is refashioned after the u-stem nouns."

    My sweet honey bee

  • One would expect a hypothetical PIE u-stem **gʰóndus 'grasper; hand' to end up as **gantuz in Proto-Germanic but certainly not *handuz which rather suggests a non-existent PIE stem **kondʰ-u-.

    Archive 2009-10-01

  • In light of Hittite militu- 'honeysweet'2, a characteristically Indo-European u-stem adjective derived from milit- 'honey', there should be no doubt where the first element comes from.

    Archive 2009-12-01

  • What is strangely compelling of course, is that madhu- could go back to something like this: *madH-u- An u-stem derivation from *madH.

    Enticed by a drunken thought

  • Glen Gordon: "You never bothered reading Douglas/Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, p.271 under *mélit: "... while OIr mil gen. melo is an i-stem, analogically refashioned after the u-stem 'mead'."

    My sweet honey bee

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