Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Pertaining to ulmin; designating an acid obtained from ulmin.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to ulmin; designating an acid obtained from ulmin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Noting an acid, a compound, C20H 14O6, contained in the red coloring-matter of beet-root juice and also found in sugar-cane juice. It may be prepared by the action of alkali on glucose.
  • Noting an acid found in earth-mold, a product of the decay of vegetable matter. See ulmin.

Etymologies

Latin ulmus an elm: compare French ulmique. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The terms ulmic and humic acids do not refer each to a single compound, but rather to a group of bodies of closely similar appearance and properties, which, however, do differ slightly in their characteristics, and differ also in composition by containing more or less of oxygen and hydrogen in equal equivalents.

    Peat and its Uses as Fertilizer and Fuel

  • It is highly probable that a certain quantity of potash in the soil may exist in combination with humic and ulmic acids, forming insoluble potassium humates and ulmates.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • The second class of substances formed are _soluble organic acids_, such as _humic_ and _ulmic acids_.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • A theory has been advanced that it is due to the formation of insoluble ulmates and humates, formed by the union of ulmic and humic acids, along with the bases fixed.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • Mulder, it is composed of a number of organic bodies, and he has identified the following substances -- ulmin, humin, ulmic, humic, geic acids, &c.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • When a soil is boiled with a solution of caustic potash, a deep brown fluid is obtained, from which acids precipitate a dark brown flocculent substance, consisting of a mixture of at least three different acids, to which the names of humic, ulmic, and geic acids have been applied.

    Elements of Agricultural Chemistry

  • The first microscopic symptom of decay in paper is irregularity of surface, with a slight change of color, indicating the commencement of the process just noticed, during which, in addition to carbonic acid, certain organic acids are formed, as crenic and ulmic acids, which, if the paper has been stained by a coloring matter, will form spots of red on the surface.

    Forty Centuries of Ink

  • -- From the usually yellowish liquid out of which the ulmic and humic acids have been separated, may further be procured by appropriate chemical means, not needful to be detailed here, two other bodies which bear the names respectively of _Crenic

    Peat and its Uses as Fertilizer and Fuel

  • Thus the inert matters that resist the immediate solvent power of alkalies, absorb oxygen from the air, and form the humic or ulmic acids soluble in alkalies; the humic acids undergo conversion into crenic acid, and this body, by oxidation, passes into apocrenic acid.

    Peat and its Uses as Fertilizer and Fuel

  • In ordinary soils, the earths and oxides just named, predominate over the alkalies, and although they may contain considerable ulmic and humic acids, water is able to extract but very minute quantities of the latter, on account of the insolubility of the compounds they have formed.

    Peat and its Uses as Fertilizer and Fuel

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