Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not hackneyed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not hackneyed; not worn out or rendered stale, flat, or commonplace by frequent use or repetition.

Etymologies

un- +‎ hackneyed (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • All true—and all blessedly irrelevant to Shakespeare & Company's "Romeo and Juliet," a production so unhackneyed and emotionally immediate that you'll feel as though you're seeing that most ubiquitous of masterpieces through a first-timer's eyes.

    Love, Fresh and New

  • Who are you? and I know you; with the sly pointing of the finger, the arch nod of the head, and the pert squeak of the voice, though wearisome to those who frequent such assemblies, were, to her unhackneyed observation, additional subjects of amusement.

    Cecilia

  • The young man, with the proud probity of unhackneyed sentiment, made a vindication of his uncorrupt intentions; which produced but louder mirth, and coarser incredulity.

    Camilla

  • THE shame and distress natural to every unhackneyed mind, in any necessity of soliciting a pecuniary favour, had now, in that of Camilla, the additional difficulty of coping against the avowed desire of Mrs. Arlbery not to open her purse.

    Camilla

  • 'Tis so intelligent, yet so unhackneyed. so full of meaning, yet so artless, that, while I look at her, I feel myself involuntarily anxious for her welfare. '

    Camilla

  • The filmmaker's draw a fresh, unhackneyed bead on the clash of cultures.

    Smiling in the Dark

  • The movie, of course, looks great, and Foster and Stewart (who may remind you of Jodie as a kid) have a nice, unhackneyed rapport.

    Periscope

  • Quick were they to recognise the signs of this evil; and wherever they saw its trace - whether in look, word, or deed; whether they read it in the fresh vigorous style of a book, or listened to it in interesting, unhackneyed, pure, expressive language - they shuddered - they recoiled: danger was above their heads - peril about their steps.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • The youth and apparent frankness of Waverley stood in strong contrast to the shades of suspicion which darkened around him, and he had a sort of naivete and openness of demeanour that seemed to belong to one unhackneyed in the ways of intrigue, and which pleaded highly in his favour.

    Waverley

  • She was young, recently married, fresh and unhackneyed in society, and my imagination decked her out with everything that was pure, lovely, innocent, and angelic in womanhood.

    Washington Irving

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.