Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Immensity.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. vastness; immensity

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Vastness; immense extent.
  • n. Destruction; vastation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Destruction; vastation.
  • n. Vastness; immense extent.

Etymologies

Latin vāstitūdō, from vāstus, vast.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Five years in narrow walls had unfitted me for the enormous declivity of the stairway, for the vastitude of the prison yard.

    Chapter 22

  • And I, for one, and for still other reasons, congratulate myself upon the vastitude of my good fortune.

    CHAPTER XXXVII

  • And I could not but thrill as I glimpsed the vastitude of spirit that inhabited these frail, perishing carcasses of us -- the three incorrigibles of solitary.

    Chapter 20

  • He did not know that it was a mere fractional part of the great island of Ysabel, that was again one island of a thousand, many of them greater, that composed the Solomon Islands that men marked on charts as a group of specks in the vastitude of the far-western South Pacific.

    Chapter 1

  • The Elsinore is truly the ship of souls, the world in miniature; and, because she is such a small world, cleaving this vastitude of ocean as our larger world cleaves space, the strange juxtapositions that continually occur are startling.

    CHAPTER XXVI

  • Beyond this, there was no ray in all the vastitude of night that surrounded me; save that, far in the North, that soft, mist-like glow still shone.

    The House on the Borderland

  • I was confronted with the vastitude of the universe at once, without the ingratiating introduction of the fairy tale.

    Adventures in the Arts Informal Chapters on Painters, Vaudeville, and Poets

  • The one thing that he accomplished was to depict the ruin of an heroic nature through an insatiable ambition for supremacy, doomed by its own vastitude to defeat itself, -- supremacy of conquest and dominion with Tamburlaine, supremacy of knowledge with Dr. Faustus, supremacy of wealth with Barabas, the Jew of

    The Theory of the Theatre

  • "Ah," Walter Merritt Emory murmured, with a vastitude of confidence and assurance.

    Chapter 19

  • Ysabel, that was again one island of a thousand, many of them greater, that composed the Solomon Islands that men marked on charts as a group of specks in the vastitude of the far-western South

    Chapter 1

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