Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Characterized by vibration.
  • adj. Capable of or adapted to vibratory motion.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Adapted to, or used in, vibratory motion; having the power of vibrating.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Adapted to, or used in, vibratory motion; having the power of vibrating; vibratory.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Capable of vibrating; susceptible of being vibrated; vibratory: as, a vibratile organ; vibratile action or motion.

Etymologies

French, from Latin vibrātus, past participle of vibrāre, to vibrate; see vibrate.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Algae and Fungi becomes, under many circumstances, partially, or completely, freed from its woody case, and exhibits movements of its whole mass, or is propelled by the contractility of one, or more, hair-like prolongations of its body, which are called vibratile cilia.

    Autobiography and Selected Essays

  • The protoplasm of Algae and Fungi becomes, under many circumstances, partially, or completely, freed from its woody case, and exhibits movements of its whole mass, or is propelled by the contractility of one, or more, hair-like prolongations of its body, which are called vibratile cilia.

    Autobiography and Selected Essays

  • The protoplasm of _Algæ_ and _Fungi_ becomes, under many circumstances, partially, or completely, freed from its woody case, and exhibits movements of its whole mass, or is propelled by the contractility of one, or more, hair-like prolongations of its body, which are called vibratile cilia.

    Lectures and Essays

  • They are all born as little transparent globular bodies, covered with vibratile cilia, swimming about in this condition for a longer or shorter time; then, tapering somewhat at one end and broadening at the other, they become attached by the narrower extremity, while at the opposite one a depression takes place, deepening in the centre till it becomes an aperture, and extending its margin to form the tentacles.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 59, September, 1862

  • They may be seen in great numbers in the spring, floating about in the water, or rather swimming, -- for the motion of all Radiates in their earliest stage of existence is rapid and constant, in consequence of the vibratile cilia that cover the surface.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 59, September, 1862

  • Early in summer these Jelly-Fishes drop their eggs, little transparent pear-shaped bodies, covered with vibratile cilia.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 59, September, 1862

  • Other protozoa differ in possessing constant forms, or in having constant vibratile processes, or shells of some kind, while in still other cases like individuals combine to make colonies which are more or less definite and permanent.

    The Doctrine of Evolution Its Basis and Its Scope

  • She is vibratile and resonant all over, so she stirs with slighter musical tremblings of the air about her.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 02, No. 08, June 1858

  • As Dr. Pierce says: The transportation is aided by the ciliary processes (little hairs) of the mucous surface of the vaginal and uterine walls, as well as by its own vibratile movements.

    Searchlights on Health The Science of Eugenics

  • At this end there is a long vibratile protoplasmic filament (_c_), by means of which the cell moves.

    Elements of Structural and Systematic Botany For High Schools and Elementary College Courses

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