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Examples

  • Came the time when our marriage was mooted -- oh, quietly, at first, most quietly, as mere palace gossip in dark corners between eunuchs and waiting-women.

    Chapter 15

  • “If your Majesty,” said Edith, in a tone which Sir Kenneth could judge to be that of respectful remonstrance, “have no other commands for me than to hear the gibes of your waiting-women, I must crave your permission to withdraw.”

    The Talisman

  • Then the waiting-women fetched censers with all manner of incense, aloe-wood and ambergris and mixed scents; and sprinkling-flasks full of rose-water were also brought and they were fumigated and perfumed.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then the Princess was incensed by her words and, drawing a sword she had by her, she smote the old woman with it and slew her; 281 whereupon the eunuch and the waiting-women and the concubines cried out at her, and ran to her father and, without stay or delay, acquainted him with her case.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So he held his peace and forbore to press her and bade the waiting-women bring food and drink.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • But ere long I saw my slave-girl herself come on board, attended by two waiting-women; whereupon what was on me of chagrin subsided and I said in myself, ‘Now shall I see her and hear her singing, till we come to Bassorah.’

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • One day, there came to her a covered tray from her father; so she uncovered it and finding therein fine fruits, asked her waiting-women, “Is the season of these fruits come?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Last of all, there came up a damsel, attended by ten slave-girls and thirty waiting-women, all of them high-bosomed maidens.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So I ate my fill and when the dishes had been taken away and we had washed our hands, she called for fruits which came without stay or delay and ordered me eat of them; and when we had ended eating she bade one of the waiting-women bring the wine furniture.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The old woman, fearing scandalous exposure, carried them both into the pavilion, and, sitting down at the door, said to the two waiting-women, “Seize the occasion to take your pleasure in the garden, for the Princess sleepeth.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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