Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A Scotch form of valise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • -- here Mottle-face leaned over and once more winked his owl-like eye -- "but 'e ain't mentioned the vord' walise 'all night, sir -- so' elp me!"

    The Amateur Gentleman

  • ’—She followed him to his horse, and, while he drew the girths of his saddle, adjusted the walise and put on the bridle, still plied him with questions concerning Mr. Bertram’s death, and the fate of his daughter; on which, however, she could obtain little information from the honest farmer.

    Chapter XXII

  • "Ve're at it now; ve've been a-coming to that theer blessed walise ever since you come aboard."

    The Amateur Gentleman

  • "Gentleman's walise for the boot, Valter; and sharp's the vord!"

    The Amateur Gentleman

  • "Your walise, sir? we'm a-coming to that;" and here, once more,

    The Amateur Gentleman

  • Tillie, you go on up and pack your clo'es in a walise or whatever, and hurry down here back.

    Tillie, a Mennonite Maid; a Story of the Pennsylvania Dutch

  • I'll tell you the very words; it's no worth making a lie for the matter --- ` Pate, said I, ` what ado had the lords and lairds and gentles at Lunnun wi the carle and his walise?

    Rob Roy

  • Waverley for his horse --- ` ` Na, na! if ye are nae friend to kirk and the king, and are detained as siccan a person, ye maun answer to honest men of the country for breach of contract and I maun keep the naig and the walise for damage and expense, in respect my horse and mysell will lose to-morrow's day's-wark, besides the afternoon preaching. ''

    The Waverley

  • "Are you a going to rob the gent of his walise?" said the indignant Boots of the Bull as he rescued

    The Vicar of Bullhampton

  • So I looks out o 'the window; and there surely I did see two horses yoked to a shay, and a fellah a-pullin' a box up o 'top; and out comes a walise and a bag; and I think it was old Wyat, please'm, that Miss Milly calls L'Amour, that stood in the doorway a-talking to the driver.'

    Uncle Silas A Tale of Bartram-Haugh

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