Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who makes weapons of war; an armorer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Trade and the possibilities of trade ... it would be much easier on the citizens of White Gryphon if they could get their hands on proper plows, and not the trial-and-error instruments they had now, made by a weapon-smith who thought he recalled the one lesson he'd had in forging such things, twenty years ago.

    The White Gryphon

  • And the helmet white that his head protected was destined to dare the deeps of the flood, through wave-whirl win: 'twas wound with chains, decked with gold, as in days of yore the weapon-smith worked it wondrously, with swine-forms set it, that swords nowise, brandished in battle, could bite that helm.

    Beowulf

  • Salisbury, a serious undertaking for a London burgess, who had little about him of the ancient northern weapon-smith, and had wanted to avail himself of the protection of the suite of the Bishop of Salisbury, returning from Parliament.

    The Armourer's Prentices

  • Fru Astrida said Osmond was quite right -- no good weapon-smith ever toiled with open doors; and when the boys asked him questions as to his work, he only smiled, and said that they would see what it was when the call to arms should come.

    The Little Duke

  • If you're looking to relive a little of the tom-foolery of your youth this weekend, it's tough to go wrong with adopting the occupation of every school-age boy: amateur weapon-smith.

    Lifehacker

  • If you’re looking to relive a little of the tom-foolery of your youth this weekend, it’s tough to go wrong with adopting the occupation of every school-age boy: amateur weapon-smith.

    Construct A Crossbow Out Of Office Supplies | Lifehacker Australia

  • And the helmet white that his head protected was destined to dare the deeps of the flood, through wave-whirl win: ’twas wound with chains, decked with gold, as in days of yore the weapon-smith worked it wondrously, with swine-forms set it, that swords nowise, brandished in battle, could bite that helm.

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

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