Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In old Enq. usage, the distinctive service of a serf or villein, being a specified number of days, usually three, in each week.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • From the "Rectitudines Singularum Personarum," an eleventh-century document, we learn that the _cotsetle_, for his holding of about five acres, was required to labour for his lord on one day a week all through the year, [17] and this was known as _week-work_.

    The Customs of Old England

  • His week-work amounted to two or three days a week, as the season required; in winter, he had "to lie at his lord's fold," when bidden; and he had to contribute his quota of boon-work.

    The Customs of Old England

  • The compensating advantage is that when she does begin to "make good" her improvement is usually registered in her earnings more quickly and accurately than it would be by the safe but slowly advancing "week-work."

    The Making of a Trade School

  • True, the freeman no longer had week-work to do, provided he could pay for his time, and in theory at least he could marry as he chose and move freely from place to place.

    A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1.

  • The boon-works continued to be claimed after the week-work had disappeared, since labor was not so easy to obtain at the specially busy seasons of the year, and the required few days 'services at ploughing or mowing or harvesting were correspondingly valuable.

    An Introduction to the Industrial and Social History of England

  • This "week-work" was most frequently for three days a week, sometimes for two, sometimes for four; sometimes for one number of days in the week during a part of the year, for another number during the remainder.

    An Introduction to the Industrial and Social History of England

  • Combining the week-work, the regular boon-works, and the extra specified services, it will be seen that the labor required from the customary tenant was burdensome in the extreme.

    An Introduction to the Industrial and Social History of England

  • "week-work," or, if this were commuted, done for hire, were much valued, and concessions made to them accordingly.

    An Introduction to the Industrial and Social History of England

  • The week-work was first and freely commuted, for regular hired labour was easy to obtain; but the boon-work -- the work, that is, which was required for unusual circumstances of a purely temporary character (such as harvesting,

    Mediaeval Socialism

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.