Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Long-breathed; having good wind; strong of lung.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And now, resume thine office, friend Ranald, in respect I am well-breathed; or, to be more plain, I PRAE, SEQUAR, as we used to say at

    A Legend of Montrose

  • Dr. Bowdler, perhaps, with well-breathed body and soul, did not quite comprehend how vacant and well worn out both heart and lungs were under poor Starke's bony chest.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 74, December, 1863

  • The references to the well-breathed beagles and the circling hare are happy, and very characteristic of the poet's telling style in the couplet in brackets.

    Lines in Pleasant Places Being the Aftermath of an Old Angler

  • And now, resume thine office, friend Ranald, in respect I am well-breathed; or, to be more plain, _I pr, sequar, _ as we used to say at Mareschal

    A Legend of Montrose

  • Exceeding swift was she, and well-breathed withal, so that Walter wondered at her; and eager she was in the chase as the very hounds, heeding nothing the scratching of briars or the whipping of stiff twigs as she sped on.

    Wood Beyond the World

  • He sets out like a carrier's horse, plodding on, because he knows he must, with the bells of matrimony chiming so melancholy about his neck, in pain till he's at his journey's end; and, despairing to get thither, he is fain to fortify imagination with the thoughts of another woman: I take heat after heat, like a well-breathed courser, and -- But hark, what noise is that?

    The works of John Dryden, $c now first collected in eighteen volumes. $p Volume 04

  • A less matter would hold a well-breathed minstrel in subject for recitation for a calendar month, Sundays and holidays included.”

    Castle Dangerous

  • And now, resume thine office, friend Ranald, in respect I am well-breathed; or, to be more plain, I PRAE, SEQUAR, as we used to say at Mareschal-College. "

    A Legend of Montrose

  • A less matter would hold a well-breathed minstrel in subject for recitation for a calendar month, Sundays and holidays included. "

    Waverley Novels — Volume 12

  • "Then well done, my brother," quoth Fra Rinaldo, "well-breathed must thou be.

    The Decameron, Volume II

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