Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • What; what kind of.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Derncleugh, left his horses to the care of the blackguard boy, confiding, it is to be supposed, rather in the years and discretion of the cattle, than in those of their keeper, and set off full speed, to see, as he exprest himself, "whaten a sort o 'fun was gaun on."

    The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III

  • 'Latt the young ozebird aloun, zay I. Makk zuch ado about un, wi' hogs'-puddens, and hock-bits, and lambs'-mate, and whaten bradd indade, and brewers 'ale avore dinner-time, and her not to zit wi' no winder aupen -- draive me mad 'e doo, the ov'ee, zuch a passel of voouls.

    Lorna Doone; a Romance of Exmoor

  • ` ` Wha's aught ye, callant? whaten a gate's that to ride? ''

    The Antiquary

  • I wish I had whaten books ye wanted, Mr. Butler, for they hae haill houses of them here, and they are obliged to set sum out in the street, whilk are sald cheap, doubtless, to get them out of the weather.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • Derncleugh, left his horses to the care of a blackguard boy, confiding, it is to be supposed, rather in the years and discretion of the cattle than in those of their keeper, and set off full speed to see, as he expressed himself, 'whaten a sort o' fun was gaun on. '

    Guy Mannering — Complete

  • The driver, understanding what was going on at Derncleugh, left his horses to the care of a blackguard boy, confiding, it is to be supposed, rather in the years and discretion of the cattle than in those of their keeper, and set off full speed to see, as he expressed himself, 'whaten a sort o' fun was gaun on. '

    Guy Mannering, Or, the Astrologer — Volume 02

  • "Wha's aught ye, callant? whaten a gate's that to ride?"

    The Antiquary — Complete

  • Things is main an 'dear; four-pound loaves is at sixteenpence; an' there's a deal o 'talk on a famine i' t 'land; an' whaten a paid for my victual an 't' bed i 't' lean-to helped t 'oud woman a bit, -- an' she's sadly down i 't' mouth, for she cannot hear on a lodger for t 'tak' my place, for a 'she's moved o'er to t' other side o 't' bridge for t 'be nearer t' new buildings, an 't' grand new walk they're makin 'round t' cliffs, thinkin 'she'd be likelier t' pick up a labourer as would be glad on a bed near his work.

    Sylvia's Lovers — Volume 3

  • ‘Latt the young ozebird aloun, zay I. Makk zuch ado about un, wi’ hogs’-puddens, and hock-bits, and lambs’-mate, and whaten bradd indade, and brewers’ ale avore dinner-time, and her not to zit wi’ no winder aupen — draive me mad ‘e doo, the ov’ee, zuch a passel of voouls.

    Lorna Doone

  • Derncleugh, left his horses to the care of a blackguard boy, confiding, it is to be supposed, rather in the years and discretion of the cattle than in those of their keeper, and set off full speed to see, as he expressed himself, ‘whaten a sort o’ fun was gaun on.’

    Guy Mannering

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