Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A kind of food made of milk or cream, eggs, sugar, bread, etc., baked in a pot.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of food made of milk or cream, eggs, sugar, bread, etc., baked in a pot.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dish made of milk or cream, eggs, sugar, bread or rice, and sometimes fruit, spices, etc., baked in a pot. or in a bowl placed in a quick oven.
  • n. A drink consisting of port wine heated, with a roasted lemon, sugar, and spices added.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For all this lady was bred at court, she became an excellent country-wife, she brought ten children, and when I shew you the library, you shall see in her own hand (allowing for the difference of the language) the best receipt now in _England_ both for an hasty - pudding and a white-pot.

    The Coverley Papers

  • For all this lady was bred at court, she became an excellent country wife, she brought ten children, and when I show you the library, you shall see in her own hand (allowing for the difference of the language) the best receipt now in English both for a hasty pudding and a white-pot.

    The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IV (of X)—Great Britain and Ireland II

  • Also thirty rings of black-pot, a dozen of white-pot, and ten knots of tender and well-washed chitterlings, cooked plain in case she should like a change.

    The Trumpet-Major

  • But a Devonshire white-pot must needs have much more;

    Ancient Poems, Ballads, and Songs of the Peasantry of England

  • For all this lady was bred at court, she became an excellent country-wife, she brought ten children, and when I shew you the library, you shall see in her own hand (allowing for the difference of the language) the best receipt now in England both for an hasty-pudding and a white-pot.

    Days with Sir Roger De Coverley

  • England both for an hasty-pudding and a white-pot.

    The De Coverley Papers From 'The Spectator'

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