Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • “Look, we have no way of knowing yet if this is a hoax or a sick joke, but it could derail the entire investigation if you give it undue prominence in your paper and everyone has to go hightailing off on a wild-goose chase.”

    The Priest

  • They all need to finish what is already started before they go off on their own wild-goose chase.

    Senate panels moving on probe of Fort Hood shootings

  • I think I have an idea of who is causing the sabotage and just want to get his feedback first, before I send us all on a wild-goose chase.

    Sabotage Surrender

  • Not the most exciting assignment -- until Teddy's "wild-goose chase" quickly evolves into an investigation of a vicious murder.

    The Highly Effective Detective by Richard Yancey: Book summary

  • On the instant a score of the men who had declined to accompany him on the wild-goose chase were crowding about him with proffered gold-sacks.

    Chapter IX

  • The tricky case of the week puts everyone through the emotional wringer, involving a dying woman calling out her husband's infidelity as she sends the PI's on a wild-goose chase for a sapphire ring that's actually a blue diamond.

    Matt's TV Week in Review

  • Translation: We're not going to condone this wild-goose chase.

    Democrats bewitched, bothered and bewildered

  • “Could be another wild-goose chase, but what else have we got?”

    Risk No Secrets

  • “I gotta tell you,” he said, “I thought it was a wild-goose chase.”

    Unspeakable

  • Louis tried to picture the cool and collected Gabe running around on a wild-goose chase.

    LUCKY

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