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Phrasal has looked up 288 words, created 1 list, listed 1 word, written 0 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 0 words.

Comments by Phrasal

  • I have read comments where "where" (or any given adverb) can be classified as either a relative adverb or as a conjunctive adverb, as in the following Shakespeare examples:
    1)
    Macbeth 1.5.62-63
    LADY MACBETH: Oh, never shall sun that morrow see!
    Your face, my thane, is as a book where men may read strange matters.
    2)
    I Henry VI 5.4.86-91 “gloomy” (Shakespeare coinage)
    PUCELLE:
    Then lead me hence, with whom I leave my curse: may never glorious sun reflct his beams upon the country where you make abode…

    How should "where" be classified in a dictionary when it modifies a noun preceding it? Is this a matter of "to each their own"?
    Scott

    January 9, 2012

  • Erin, this is Scott Nelson again (idiom synonym dictionary). Wonderful updating of your wordnik site -- so cool. One question I have about the entries -- If a retrieval for a word with the spelling of "off-brand" says, "Do you mean "off brand", does that mean that the hyphenated spelling is preferred? dictionary.com automatically directs the spelling of "off brand" to "off-brand". I need to know for my dictionary database how your site determines preferred spellings regarding hypenated/non-hypenated. (P.S. I may show up at the next DSNA conference again. Would be nice to see you.)

    January 6, 2012

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  • I have read comments where "where" (or any given adverb) can be classified as either a relative adverb or as a conjunctive adverb, as in the following Shakespeare examples:
    1)
    Macbeth 1.5.62-63
    LADY MACBETH: Oh, never shall sun that morrow see!
    Your face, my thane, is as a book where men may read strange matters.
    2)
    I Henry VI 5.4.86-91 “gloomy” (Shakespeare coinage)
    PUCELLE:
    Then lead me hence, with whom I leave my curse: may never glorious sun reflct his beams upon the country where you make abode…

    How should "where" be classified in a dictionary when it modifies a noun preceding it? Is this a matter of "to each their own"?
    Scott

    January 9, 2012

  • Hi, there's a Feedback tab to the left. That is the best way of making sure someone reads your question.

    January 6, 2012

  • Erin, this is Scott Nelson again (idiom synonym dictionary). Wonderful updating of your wordnik site -- so cool. One question I have about the entries -- If a retrieval for a word with the spelling of "off-brand" says, "Do you mean "off brand", does that mean that the hyphenated spelling is preferred? dictionary.com automatically directs the spelling of "off brand" to "off-brand". I need to know for my dictionary database how your site determines preferred spellings regarding hypenated/non-hypenated. (P.S. I may show up at the next DSNA conference again. Would be nice to see you.)

    January 6, 2012