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patiomensch has looked up 0 words, created 1 list, listed 73 words, written 37 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 2 words.

Comments by patiomensch

  • Condalmo, it's you!

    May 21, 2007

  • Madonn!

    April 25, 2007

  • I'd be a hypcrite if, with a nickname like 'patiomensch,' this weren't in my Words list.

    April 25, 2007

  • After seeing Koyaanisqatsi, who can see this word and not hear, "KOOYYAANNISQATSI... KOYAANNISQATSI..." etc.? It's unpossible!

    April 25, 2007

  • Any motion verb would work, methinks. "Whence it flew/flowed/drifted" and on and on and on and on.

    April 18, 2007

  • A character in Trainspotting dies from this, in combo with AIDS.

    April 16, 2007

  • Bunbury's also used in Jonathan Ames's "The Extra Man." As in "Earnest," he's a made-up guy; they use him to disguise where they've truly been, so that they'll remain mysteries to each other. "I was out with Bunbury."

    April 16, 2007

  • There are tons of neologisms on this site.

    April 15, 2007

  • Hmm.. we have two versions of this up now, each with a different spelling. I wonder which one is correct. does search

    Oh, apparently, paraskavedekatriaphobia and paraskevodekatriaphobia and paraskevidekatriaphobia are all correct. Nice.

    April 15, 2007

  • "Legs scissoring to the rhythm?" Sounds pretty hot. Go feminism!

    April 14, 2007

  • *feels like the pedant rushing in, so eager to correct a mistake* It's actually 'lapis.' :D

    April 14, 2007

  • It makes me angry when people say "from whence." ARRR!!!

    April 14, 2007

  • Someone needs to join me here on 'diphallic.'

    April 14, 2007

  • Can't see this w/o thinking CAMILLE PAGLIA.

    April 14, 2007

  • I get caught up a bit on that 'nt,' but once you reach 'textual,' it flows o so smoothly to the end.

    April 14, 2007

  • This word is familiar to anyone who's read Chuck Palahniuk's INVISIBLE MONSTERS. There is confusion at the dinner table.

    April 14, 2007

  • A man who must be loved.

    April 14, 2007

  • "American Martin K. Speckter concocted the interrobang itself in 1962. As the head of an advertising agency, Speckter believed that advertisements would look better if advertising copywriters conveyed surprised queries using a single mark. He proposed the concept of a single punctuation mark in an article in the magazine TYPEtalks. Speckter solicited possible names for the new character from readers. Contenders included rhet, exclarotive, and exclamaquest, but he settled on interrobang. He chose the name to reference the punctuation marks that inspired it. Interrogatio is Latin for "a rhetorical question" or "cross-examination"; bang is printers' slang for "exclamation point". 1 The French equivalent is "point exclarrogatif", expressing a similar idea - the fusion between "point d'interrogation" (?) and "point d'exclamation" (!)."

    April 13, 2007

  • *shit-eating grin*

    April 13, 2007

  • "in-koh-it"

    April 13, 2007

  • Pronouncing this word terrifies me.

    April 13, 2007

  • This is pretty much the best word I've learned in a while.

    April 13, 2007

  • This site is awesome! I'm glad I joined last night.

    April 13, 2007

  • As in "de vivre"!

    April 13, 2007

  • An acronym I picked up from the ole DFW. He has it at "w/r/t."

    April 13, 2007

  • Interesting (from Google's def):

    "The Bethlem Royal Hospital of London, which has been variously known as Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam, is the world's oldest psychiatric hospital. Bethlehem was shortened to Bedleem and Bedlem in Middle English. The hospital was nicknamed Bedlam from early on. From the early 16th century, bedlam also came to mean `mad'. Shakespeare, in Henry 6th, speaks of "the bedlam brain-sick duchess" (1590s?). This use lasted to the early 18th century, but the late 16th century was already using bedlamite."

    April 13, 2007

  • Yes, sort of:

    'Egan is a popular family name that comes from the Irish Gaelic name Mac Aodhagáin. It is derived from the root 'aedh' meaning little fire and the diminutive 'an' hence 'the little bright-eyed one'. Spelling variations include: Egan, Eagan, Keegan, MacEgan, Kegan and Keagan. The name originates from County Tipperary (north).' (wiki)

    April 13, 2007

  • I thought this meant 'little fire.'

    April 13, 2007

  • I think both forms are acceptable.

    April 13, 2007

  • This would be a bit weird, I think.

    April 13, 2007

  • Albino = NOT a favorite word. Convert it into an '-ism,' however, and you've got a favorite. Albinism! I love saying it. 'Al-bin-ism'

    April 13, 2007

  • A sound effect, a band—can't go wrong.

    April 13, 2007

  • 'Buttsecks,' huh? Haha.

    April 13, 2007

  • A pretty cruel adjective, when applied to people.

    April 13, 2007

  • This word makes me think of my Grandpa, who used it frequently.

    April 13, 2007

  • I always think of the opening of THE SHINING when I hear/read this word. "Officious little prick."

    April 13, 2007

  • Made famous by Adam Sandler (in HAPPY GILMORE).

    Edit: Whoops. It's actually from BILLY MADISON. (The tub scene.)

    April 13, 2007

  • In place of "their," e.g. "He went to they field and threw they ball." This is a reference to Tobias Wolff, by the way.

    April 13, 2007

  • No, I don't mean 'prolapse.'

    April 13, 2007

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