Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to Assyria or its people, language, or culture.
  • n. A native or inhabitant of Assyria.
  • n. See Akkadian.
  • n. The Assyrian dialects of Akkadian.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person who resided in the ancient region on the Upper Tigris river, with capital city of Assur.
  • n. A citizen of an ancient nation and empire, including the northern half of Mesopotamia, with capital city of Nineveh.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the ancient region on the Upper Tigris river, with capital city of Assur.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the ancient nation and empire, including the northern half of Mesopotamia, with capital city of Nineveh.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Assyria, or to its inhabitants.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining or relating to Assyria or to its inhabitants.
  • n. A native or an inhabitant of Assyria, an ancient country of Asia, east of the river Tigris, long at the head of the powerful Assyrian empire, including Babylonia and other neighboring countries.
  • n. The language of the Assyrians, which has been preserved by and largely recovered from their cuneiform inscriptions. See cuneiform.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the language of modern Iraq
  • n. an inhabitant of ancient Assyria
  • n. an extinct language of the Assyrians in ancient Mesopotamia

Etymologies

From Assur, the original capital city of Assyria (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Isa Sumer and the primitive ADO - ideology: Combination of the term Assyrian / Syrian

    American Chronicle

  • Fikri Aygur and the primitive ADO ideology: Combination of the term Assyrian / Syrian

    American Chronicle

  • 2.2 Madam Tunc and the primitive ADO - ideology: Combination of the term Assyrian / Syrian

    American Chronicle

  • It is noticeable that the distinction between the Semitic newcomers and the indigenous Shumiro-Accadians continues long to be traceable in the names of the royal temple-builders, even after the new Semitic idiom, which we call the Assyrian, had entirely ousted the old language -- a process which must have taken considerable time, for it appears, and indeed stands to reason, that the newcomers, in order to secure the wished for influence and propagate their own culture, at first not only learned to understand but actually used themselves the language of the people among whom they came, at least in their public documents.

    Chaldea From the Earliest Times to the Rise of Assyria

  • Jinn reflect the sensibilities of those imagining them, just as in Assyrian times they were taken to be the spirits responsible for manias, who melted into the light at dawn.

    Archive 2006-12-01

  • The eagle-headed human figure in Assyrian sculptures is no doubt Nisroch, the same as Asshur, the chief Assyrian god; the corresponding goddess was Asheera, or Astarte; this means a "grove," or sacred tree, often found as the symbol of the heavenly hosts (Saba) in the sculptures, as Asshur the Eponymus hero of Assyria (Ge 10: 11) answered to the sun or Baal, Belus, the title of office, "Lord."

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • Adrammelech -- supposed by some to be the same as Molech, and in Assyrian mythology to stand for the sun.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • A sacred tree is often found in Assyrian sculpture; symbol of the starry hosts, Saba. gardens -- planted enclosures for idolatry; the counterpart of the garden of Eden.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • The Medes, perhaps, had such chariots, though no traces of them are found in Assyrian remains.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • Accordingly Jerome says that he read in Assyrian histories that, "when the Tyrians saw no hope of escaping, they fled to Carthage or some islands of the Ionian and AEgean Seas" [Bishop Newton].

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

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