Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A simplified version of the English language, not created but consisting of the most common English words and phrases, enabling non-English-speakers to communicate.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Blend of global and English

Examples

  • The word Globish is derived from the words “global” and English”.

    Globish – global English for the Internet Age

  • A few months ago, The Economist wrote about Globish, which is the name the newspaper gave to English spoken by people who are not native speakers.

    Aqurette.com

  • Yes, the Parisians speak French and the Berliners German, but the rising generation - often to an embarrassing degree - are using what I've called Globish as a way of hooking into global culture; music, films, and literature.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

  • Yes, the Parisians speak French and the Berliners German, but the rising generation? often to an embarrassing degree? are using what I've called Globish as a way of hooking into global culture; music, films, and literature.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

  • Like the language, the culture has gone "Globish".

    Why Lee Siegel is wrong to declare the novel dead

  • Le "Globish" présenté dans l'ouvrage de Robert McCrum est à distinguer d'un autre concept, également appelé "Globish", qui désigne un dialecte de l'anglais qui utilise 1 500 mots seulement, un système de prononciation simplifié et une orthographe dans laquelle un grand nombre des voyelles de l'anglais sont fusionnées.

    Archive 2010-07-01

  • Even English is touted as the new global language of business - one book recently called "Globish" the new lingua franca of commerce.

    Heraldstandard.com: Home RSS feed

  • For the latter, the idea of "Globish" is so obvious, and so much part of their everyday experience, it causes virtually no comment.

    Books news, reviews and author interviews | guardian.co.uk

  • 'Globish' is or how it differs from English, I googled for the term and found the ebook

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

  • Yes, English words have a wide currency, but outside of large metropolitan areas, almost nobody speaks English of any variety: not your absurd 'Globish' or any other variety.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

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