Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A radical nationalist party in pre-Communist China and subsequently the major administrative party of Taiwan.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the political party founded in 1911 by Sun Yat-sen; it governed China under Chiang Kai-shek from 1928 until 1949 when the Communists took power and subsequently was the official ruling party of Taiwan

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Mandarin 國民黨 (Guómíndǎng, "national people's party").

Examples

  • Aware of how this looked to non-Communists, Li Ta-chao, the first member of the Chinese Communist Party to join the KMT, issued a statement saying that he and the other members of the CCP had joined the KMT “because we have something to contribute to it… certainly not because of any intention to take advantage of the situation to propagate Communism in the name of Kuomintang.”

    The Last Empress

  • A previous version of this article said China is the world's largest economy and that the Kuomintang is an opposition party.

    U.S., China Ease Stance on Taiwan

  • The Nationalists, also known as the Kuomintang, lost the presidency to the Democratic Progressive Party's Chen in 2000, ending their postwar hold on power.

    Archive 2006-10-01

  • The Nationalists, also known as the Kuomintang, lost the presidency to the Democratic Progressive Party's Chen in 2000, ending their postwar hold on power.

    STOP_MA: Bloomberg Blue Bias Barefaced

  • The Kuomintang was a directive association created by the great Chinese revolutionary Sun Yat Sen, and it had gone through various vicissitudes; it had a rough general resemblance to the Communist Party and the various European fascisms, and, like them, it sustained a core of conscious purpose throughout its community.

    The Shape of Things to Come

  • My father tried to defend the Communists, saying that the struggle with the Kuomintang was a matter of life and death.

    WILD SWANS THREE DAUGHTERS OF CHINA

  • My father tried to defend the Communists, saying that the struggle with the Kuomintang was a matter of life and death.

    Wild Swans

  • My father tried to defend the Communists, saying that the struggle with the Kuomintang was a matter of life and death.

    Wild Swans

  • They were discouraged, bitter, because they had reached a house called Kuomintang 22 -- I still remember it -- where they should have found about 25 pistols and machineguns.

    CASTRO SPEAKS ON DOMINGUEZ, DEL PINO CASES

  • Taipei says the Kuomintang was the ruling party of China during the eight-year Sino-Japan

    My Sinchew -

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