Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of the hollow or grooved teeth of a venomous snake with which it injects its poison.
  • noun Any of the canine teeth of a carnivorous animal, such as a dog or wolf, with which it seizes and tears its prey.
  • noun A long, sharp, pointed tooth, especially a canine tooth.
  • noun The root of a tooth or a pronglike division of such a root.
  • noun A fanglike structure, especially a chelicera of a venomous spider.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To catch; seize; grip; clutch; lay hold of.
  • To take; receive with assent, accept.
  • To receive with hospitality, as a guest; welcome.
  • To receive (a thing given or imposed).
  • To receive or adopt into spiritual relation, as in baptism; be godfather or godmother to.
  • To seize; lay hold.
  • noun A valve in a pump; the water-seal of a pump.
  • noun A grasping; capture; the act or power of seizing; hold.
  • noun That which is seized or carried off; booty; spoils; stolen goods.
  • noun Any projection, catch, shoot, or other thing by which hold is taken; a prehensile part or organ.
  • noun Specifically — A claw or talon; a falcula.
  • noun A fin.
  • noun A long, sharp tooth, as an organ of prehension, as the canine tooth of a dog, or the tusk of a boar or an elephant.
  • noun The socketed part of a tooth, as that by which the tooth holds on to the jaw. There may be one or several fangs.
  • noun The poison-or venom-tooth of a serpent, through which venom is injected into a wound made by it. See venom, and cut under poison-fang.
  • noun The pointed and curved second joint of the falx or chelicera of a spider, pierced at the tip by the opening of the poison-duct. The term is sometimes applied to the whole chelicera. See cuts under chelicera and falx.
  • noun The tang of a tool.
  • noun Any projecting prong in a lock or a bolt.
  • noun In mining: A channel cut in the rock, or a pipe of wood, for conveying air.
  • noun plural Cage-shuts.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb obsolete To catch; to seize, as with the teeth; to lay hold of; to gripe; to clutch.
  • transitive verb To enable to catch or tear; to furnish with fangs.
  • noun (Zoöl.) The tusk of an animal, by which the prey is seized and held or torn; a long pointed tooth; esp., one of the usually erectile, venomous teeth of serpents. Also, one of the falcers of a spider.
  • noun Any shoot or other thing by which hold is taken.
  • noun (Anat.) The root, or one of the branches of the root, of a tooth. See Tooth.
  • noun (Mining) A niche in the side of an adit or shaft, for an air course.
  • noun (Mech.) A projecting tooth or prong, as in a part of a lock, or the plate of a belt clamp, or the end of a tool, as a chisel, where it enters the handle.
  • noun The valve of a pump box.
  • noun A bend or loop of a rope.
  • noun fast entangled.
  • noun said of a pump when the water has gone out.
  • noun [Scot.] to supply it with the water necessary to make it operate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A long, pointed canine tooth used for biting and tearing flesh or (in snakes) for injecting venom.
  • verb rare to strike or attack with the fangs
  • verb transitive To catch, capture; seize; grip; clutch; lay hold of.
  • verb transitive To take; receive with assent; accept.
  • verb transitive, obsolete To receive with hospitality; welcome.
  • verb transitive, obsolete To receive.
  • verb transitive, dialectal To receive or adopt into spiritual relation, as in baptism; be godfather or godmother to.
  • noun Scotland A grasping; capture; the act or power of seizing; hold.
  • noun That which is seized or carried off; booty; spoils; stolen goods.
  • noun Any projection, catch, shoot, or other thing by which hold is taken; a prehensile part or organ.
  • noun mining A channel cut in the rock, or a pipe of wood, used for conveying air.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, booty, spoils, something seized, from Old English; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From an abbreviation of fangtooth, from Middle English *fangtooth, *fengtooth, from Old English fængtōþ, fengtōþ ("canine tooth", literally "catch-tooth"). Cognate with German Fangzahn ("fang", literally "catch-tooth").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English fangen, from Old English fōn ("to take, grasp, seize, catch, capture, make prisoner, receive, accept, assume, undertake, meet with, encounter"), and Old Norse fanga ("to fetch, capture"), both from Proto-Germanic *fanhanan, *fangōnan (“to catch, capture”), from Proto-Indo-European *paḱ- (“to fasten, place”). Cognate with West Frisian fange ("to catch"), Dutch vangen ("to catch"), German fangen ("to catch"), Danish fange ("to catch"), Albanian peng ("to hinder, hold captive").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English fang, feng ("a catching, capture, seizing"), from Old English fang, feng ("grip, embrace, grasp, grasping, capture, prey, booty, plunder"), from Proto-Germanic *fangan, *fangiz, *fanhiz (“catch, catching, seizure”), from *fanhanan (“to catch, capture”), from Proto-Indo-European *peHg̑- (“to fasten”). Cognate with Scots fang ("that which is taken, capture, catch, prey, booty"), Dutch vang ("a catch"), Low German fangst ("a catch"), German Fang ("a catch, capture, booty"), Swedish fång, fångst, Icelandic fang. Related also to Latin pangere ("to solidify, drive in"), Albanian mpij ("to benumb, stiffen"), Ancient Greek  (pḗgnymi, "to stiffen, firm up"), Sanskrit  (pāśáyati, "(s)he binds").

Examples

Comments

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  • "The 4MC will be equally hilarious on the road, but even more stable, and potentially more performance-oriented - a mixture that, as a confirmed hooligan, I find very attractive. Take a look at the oiled skidpan test video below and tell me you wouldn't love to fang a 1000cc version of that puppy to and from work on a wet day."

    - Loz Blain, Sideways on a tilting 4-wheeler: the next generation of fun machines, gizmag.com, 7 May 2009.

    May 8, 2009