Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A member of a Pashto-speaking people of eastern Afghanistan and northwest Pakistan, constituting the majority population of Afghanistan.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. In India and Pakistan, a Pashtun; a member of the Pashto-speaking people of north-west Pakistan and south-east Afghanistan.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proper n. A native or inhabitant of Afghanistan, especially of the Pashtun tribes of southern Afghanistan.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A person of Afghan race settled in Hindustan, or one of kindred race in eastern Afghanistan.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an ethnic minority speaking Pashto and living in northwestern Pakistan and southeastern Afghanistan
  • n. a member of the mountain people living in the eastern regions of Afghanistan

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Hindi Paṭhān, from Pashto Pəštana, pl. of Pəštūn, an Afghan, from pašto, Pashto.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Punjabi, from plural of Pashto پشتون.

Examples

  • The life of the Pathan is thus full of interest; and his valleys, nourished alike by endless sunshine and abundant water, are fertile enough to yield with little labour the modest material requirements of a sparse population.

    Archive 2004-10-31

  • Sure, Shane Warne was guilty of hyperbole and revisionism when he called Pathan's 37-ball century the best he'd ever seen, but it was still a thrilling display of power and timing.

    Blogposts | guardian.co.uk

  • Pashtun (aka Pathan) frontier tribes - collectively mislabeled "Taliban" by western media - are up in arms again because they are being bombed by US Predator drones, and attacked by the Pakistani Army, which the US rents for $1.5 billion annually (the official figure; actually, it's a lot more), to support its widening war in Afghanistan.

    Eric Margolis: Return of the "Mad Mullah"

  • Pashtun, also called Pathan by outsiders, are the world's largest tribal people.

    Eric Margolis: Kicking a Hornet's Nest in Pakistan

  • As a soldier the Pathan is a finer shot, a hardier man, a better marcher, especially on the hillside, and possibly an even more brilliant fighter.

    The Story of the Malakand Field Force An Episode of Frontier War

  • Mahbub's hand shot into his bosom, for to call a Pathan a 'black man'

    Kim

  • Sikander Khan swore to me; and he comes of a horse-stealing clan for ten generations; he swore a Pathan was a babe beside a _Durro Mut_ in regard to horse-lifting.

    Traffics and Discoveries

  • Pashtun (aka Pathan) frontier tribes - collectively mislabeled ` Taliban 'by western media - are up in arms again because they are being bombed by US Predator drones, and attacked by the Pakistani Army, which the US rents for $1.5 billion annually (the official figure; actually, it's a lot more), to support its widening war in Afghanistan.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Additional referential clarifications and general usage guidelines in this regard include: the term Pathan will not be used unless it is contained in quotation from original documents; Pashto speakers will be identified as Pashtuns; Afghan will designate a strong territorial and weak national referent (it also will be used in the Afghan society construct); the Afghan state will refer to the Durrani dynasts who ruled (Durrani is a major confederation of Pashtun tribes within which the Saddozai, Barakzai, Muhammadzai lineages produced the rulers) their non-Durrani confidantes, and the urban and urbanized "Kabuli" bureaucrats operating the state machinery; Durrani state and Afghan state will be used interchangeably; Durrani and Ghalzi Pashtun will be distinguished as functionally separate ethnicities based on their differential relationships to the Pashto language and the Afghan state.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

  • Thus, the dynastic shift from the Suris to the Mughals did not involve a radical change in the language of the state apparatus but it did eliminate the prominence of those who used Afghan or "Pathan" identity as an idiom of their domination of northern India or Hindustan.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

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