Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to Thrace or its people.
  • n. A native or inhabitant of Thrace.
  • n. The Indo-European language of the ancient Thracians.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. of or pertaining to Thrace or the Thracians or the extinct Thracian language.
  • proper n. an inhabitant of Thrace, regardless of ethnicity
  • proper n. an ethnic Thracian, regardless of geographical location
  • proper n. the extinct language formerly spoken in Thrace.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Thrace, or its people.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The language (any language) spoken in ancient Thrace. From the scanty remains of the Thracian dialects (chiefly proper names) it is inferred that they belonged to the Indo-European family.
  • n. In geology, the uppermost stage of the Pliocene Tertiary series in the Vienna basin of Austria, represented by conglomerates, gravels, and sands containing bones of large mammals and shells of Unios and, in locally distributed freshwater limestones, the shells of Helix and Planorbis. The Thracian beds lie on the Congeria beds of the Lower Pliocene.
  • Of or pertaining to Thrace, a region in southeastern Europe (formerly a Roman province), included between the Balkans and the Ægean and Black Seas.
  • n. An inhabitant or a native of Thrace.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or relating to Thrace or its people or culture
  • n. an inhabitant of ancient Thrace
  • n. a Thraco-Phrygian language spoken by the ancient people of Thrace but extinct by the early Middle Ages

Etymologies

From Thrace +‎ -ian (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • They say that in Thracian yog meant "thick" and urt meant "milk" and that's how the word yoghurt appeared.

    Want to live 100 years? Eat Bulgarian yoghurt

  • When Brasidas had thus spoken, he prepared to sally forth with his own division, and stationed the rest of his army with Clearidas at the so-called Thracian gate, that they might come out and support him, in accordance with his instructions.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • The region here called the Thracian cities: Map 2.9, AY.

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • Hellespont, in what was called the Thracian Chersone'sus.

    Mosaics of Grecian History

  • The Odeum, or music-room, which in its interior was full of seats and ranges of pillars, and outside had its roof made to slope and descend from one single point at the top, was constructed, we are told, in imitation of the king of Persia's Pavilion; this likewise by Pericles's order; which Cratinus again, in his comedy called The Thracian Women, made an occasion of raillery, --

    The Boys' and Girls' Plutarch; being parts of the "Lives" of Plutarch, edited for boys and girls

  • Polymestor, and the paltry policy of Agamemnon, who, not daring himself to call the Thracian king to account, nevertheless beguiles him into the hands of the captive women.

    Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

  • "Thracian," said Severus with astonishment, "art thou disposed to wrestle after thy race?"

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 1

  • The Odeum, or music-room, which in its interior was full of seats and ranges of pillars, and outside had its roof made to slope and descend from one single point at the top, was constructed, we are told, in imitation of the king of Persia’s Pavilion; this likewise by Pericles’s order; which Cratinus again, in his comedy called The Thracian Women, made an occasion of raillery,

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Lucullus, on finding him gone, pursued, but was well pleased not to overtake him with his own forces in disorder; and he sat down near what is called the Thracian village, an admirable position for commanding all the roads and the places whence, and through which the provisions for Mithridates’s camp must of necessity come.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Apart from the more recently discovered branches, there are also a number of weakly attested languages, including Venetic, Messapic, Illyrian, Thracian, and Phrygian.

    The English Is Coming!

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