Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Sports An unofficial championship title attained by a horse that wins the three traditional races for a specified category.
  • n. Baseball An unofficial championship title achieved by a player who is at the head of the league in batting average, home runs, and runs batted in.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The feat of leading one's league in three key statistical categories—batting average, home runs, and RBI for hitters; wins, strikeouts, and ERA for pitchers
  • n. The three grandest or oldest open championships of the year
  • n. The three greatest thoroughbred races of the year restricted to three-year-olds: the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and Belmont Stakes
  • n. The three greatest thoroughbred races of the year restricted to three-year-olds: the 2,000 Guineas Stakes, Derby Stakes (aka "Epsom Derby"), and St. Leger Stakes
  • n. The three greatest thoroughbred races of the year restricted to three-year-olds: the Queen's Plate, Prince of Wales Stakes, and Breeders' Stakes
  • n. Victory by one of the Home Nations — England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales — over the other three in the annual Six Nations Championship.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • —Reds president Bill DeWitt, on why he traded Frank Robinson to the Orioles in 1966 Robinson won the Triple Crown that year and led Baltimore to a World Series title

    Baseball’s Even Greater Insults

  • That bold, risky move got just enough from his horse and at the finish, it was Affirmed by a nose to become horse racing’s eleventh and last Triple Crown winner.

    One Season

  • That summer, Thrift Drugs, a major sponsor of American cycling, offered a one-million-dollar bonus to any rider who could win the Triple Crown of Cycling, which meant all three of the most prestigious races in the United States.

    LANCE ARMSTRONG

  • Racing ten times, Affirmed emerged triumphant on seven occasions, including three classic Triple Crown confrontations.

    One Season

  • Perhaps no one on either team knew the answer as well as Graig Nettles, who had been with the Twins in 1967, when Yastrzemski, in that amazing Triple Crown season, had taken it upon himself to carry the Red Sox into the World Series.

    The Greatest Game

  • Because the last jewel of the Triple Crown was the longest race—the 1-1/2-mile distance of the Belmont was a quarter of a mile longer than the Derby and 5/16 of a mile longer than the Preakness—most figured Alydar would finally vindicate his legacy with a win that would deny Affirmed the Triple Crown.

    One Season

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