Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who adds.
  • noun An instrument for performing addition.
  • noun The popular English name of the viper, Vipera communis, now Pelias berus, a common venomous serpent of Europe (and the only poisonous British reptile), belonging to the family Viperidæ, of the suborder Solenoglypha, of the order Ophidia.
  • noun A name loosely applied to various snakes more or less resembling the viper, Pelias berus: as
  • noun The sea-stickleback or adder-fish. See adder-fish.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete A serpent.
  • noun A small venomous serpent of the genus Vipera. The common European adder is the Vipera berus or Pelias berus. The puff adders of Africa are species of Clotho.
  • noun In America, the term is commonly applied to several harmless snakes, as the milk adder, puffing adder, etc.
  • noun Same as Sea Adder.
  • noun One who, or that which, adds; esp., a machine for adding numbers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Someone who or something which performs arithmetic addition.
  • noun Something which adds or increases.
  • noun obsolete A snake.
  • noun A name loosely applied to various snakes more or less resembling the viper; a viper.
  • noun chiefly UK A small venomous serpent of the genus Vipera. The common European adder is the Vipera berus. The puff adders of Africa are species of the genus Oecobius.
  • noun US, Canada Any of several small nonvenomous snakes resembling the adder, such as the milk snake.
  • noun The sea-stickleback or adder-fish.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a machine that adds numbers
  • noun a person who adds numbers
  • noun small terrestrial viper common in northern Eurasia

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

to add + -er.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English addere, misdivision of naddere, from Old English nǣdre, nǣddre ("snake, serpent, viper, adder"), from Proto-Germanic *nēdrōn, *nadrōn (“snake, viper”) (compare West Frisian njirre, Dutch adder, German Natter, Otter), from pre-Germanic *néh₁treh₂, variant of Proto-Indo-European *nh₁trih₂ (compare Welsh neidr, Latin natrīx ‘watersnake’), from *sneh₁- (“to spin, twist”) (compare Dutch naaien). More at needle.

Examples

Comments

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  • "With adder, the 'n-swapping' went the other way round. Old English a nadder became an adder."

    -By Hook or By Crook by David Crystal, p 93

    December 15, 2008