Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Oppression; hardship; injury; grievance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Archaic Oppression; hardship; injury; grievance.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun oppression; hardship; injury; grievance.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A particular aggrievance for Ray, was the casting of Ryan Phillipe and Val Kilmer who both should know way better than to fall down to these depths.

    MACGRUBER first look! | Obsessed With Film

  • Without undertaking to affirm, we may obviously conjecture, that this Article has been inserted on the part of the United States from an over-caution to guard, nommément, by name, against a particular aggrievance; which they thought they could never be too well secured against: and that has happened, which generally happens; doubts have been produced by the too great number of words used to prevent doubt.

    Reports and Opinions While Secretary of State

  • Without undertaking to affirm, we may obviously conjecture that this article has been inserted on the part of the United States from an overcaution to guard, _nommément, by name_, against a particular aggrievance, which they thought they could never be too well secured against; and that has happened which generally happens -- doubts have been produced by the too great number of words used to prevent doubt.

    A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 1, part 1: George Washington

  • Thus the destruction, in every sense of the word, of human creatures, is so constantly obvious, as mingled and spread throughout the whole system, that the mind has been insensibly wrought to that protective obtuseness which (like the thickness of the natural clothing of animals in rigorous climates) we acquire in defence of our own ease, against the aggrievance of things which inevitably continue in our presence.

    An Essay on the Evils of Popular Ignorance

  • Without undertaking to affirm, we may obviously conjecture, that this article has been inserted on the part of the United States, from an over caution to guard, _nommément_, by name, against a particular aggrievance, which they thought could never be too well secured against: and that has happened, which generally happens; doubts have been produced by the too great number of words used to prevent doubt.

    Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 3

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