Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having an element of chance.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin āleātōrius (see aleatory) + English -ic

Examples

  • A recent comment made to a posted essay by DB of DB's Medical Rants spoke of a term I had not heard before, namely aleatoric uncertainty.

    Archive 2007-12-01

  • A recent comment made to a posted essay by DB of DB's Medical Rants spoke of a term I had not heard before, namely aleatoric uncertainty.

    Stochastic and epistemic uncertainty and the ecological fallacy

  • It was a perfect curtain raiser for the season's finale as there were "aleatoric" sections in the score where the players were asked to improvise sound for stated periods of time, as the conductor slowly spelled out "one, two, three" with his fingers.

    The End of The Season

  • It was a perfect curtain raiser for the season's finale as there were "aleatoric" sections in the score where the players were asked to improvise sound for stated periods of time, as the conductor slowly spelled out "one, two, three" with his fingers.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • Just occasionally the music reveals what might have been – in the aleatoric choral writing depicting the cyber-babble of the chatrooms, the multi-layered chorus with which the work ends, or some of the wonderfully voiced orchestral textures, such as the poignant string lines that underpin the aria in which Brian attempts to describe the importance of the internet in his life.

    Two Boys - review

  • Just occasionally the music reveals what might have been – in the aleatoric choral writing depicting the cyber-babble of the chatrooms, the multi-layered chorus with which the work ends, or some of the wonderfully voiced orchestral textures, such as the poignant string lines that underpin the aria in which Brian attempts to describe the importance of the internet in his life.

    Two Boys - review

  • It's aleatoric — what is an election, after all, but chance operations within a tightly controlled framework?

    You'll Never Get Rich

  • The program's ability to turn any phrase of suitable size into music also gives it a kinship with aleatoric developments.

    Mother, Superior

  • (All music is "process" — even aleatoric music — we're just not likely to notice it as process if we can easily imagine the outlines of a "narrative" within its working out.)

    Hub helmer headlines crix confab

  • Then came nepenthe and scholium, aleatoric and consuetude.

    Pool of National Spelling Bee competitors whittled down to 48

Comments

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  • Wikipedia states that aleatoric is derived from the Latin phrase "rolling of the dice." In most instances in which I've come across it, it refers to the production of art "by chance," that is, by capitalizing on or employing random processes.

    May 30, 2011

  • Wikipedia also offers the following etymology: "The term became known to European composers through lectures by acoustician Werner Meyer-Eppler at the Darmstadt International Summer Courses for New Music in the beginning of the 1950s. According to his definition, "a process is said to be aleatoric ... if its course is determined in general but depends on chance in detail" (Meyer-Eppler 1957, 55). Through a confusion of Meyer-Eppler's German terms Aleatorik (noun) and aleatorisch (adjective), his translator created a new English word, "aleatoric" (rather than using the existing English adjective "aleatory"), which quickly became fashionable and has persisted (Jacobs 1966). More recently, the variant "aleatoriality" has been introduced (Roig-Francolí 2008, 340)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aleatoric_music&oldid=896913303

    September 17, 2019