Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Christianity The doctrine or belief that the Gospel frees Christians from required obedience to any law, whether scriptural, civil, or moral, and that salvation is attained solely through faith and the gift of divine grace.
  • noun The belief that moral laws are relative in meaning and application as opposed to fixed or universal.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The tenets of the antinomians.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The tenets or practice of Antinomians.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Christianity a religious movement which believes that only the spiritual 'law of Faith' (Romans 3:27) is essential for salvation; and which is 'against' all other practical 'laws' being taught as being essential for salvation; and refering to them as legalism.
  • noun Judaism opposition to the Torah.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the theological doctrine that by faith and God's grace a Christian is freed from all laws (including the moral standards of the culture)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From antinomian +‎ -ism, coined by Martin Luther, notably used in his Against the Antinomians (1539).

Examples

  • Perhaps you are right that antinomianism is not the best word, but then what would you suggest is a better one?

    Matthew Yglesias » Books-a-Million

  • Since its antinomianism is so restricted and its lust for blood is minimal, however, it is not an especially dangerous (or effective) one.

    The truth about left and right « Isegoria

  • As for antinomianism, that isn't my intention, more that I want to reduce the law any law away from being an absolute.

    Quote of the Day (Eric Reitan)

  • Dositheus is said to have opposed antinomianism, that is, the rejection of Old

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 13: Revelation-Stock

  • That Bruno himself, in "the enthusiasm of the idea," drew from his axiom of the "indifference of contraries" the practical consequence which is in very deed latent there, that he was ready to sacrifice to the antinomianism, which is certainly a part of its rigid logic, the purities of his youth for instance, there is no proof.

    Giordano Bruno

  • That Bruno himself, in "the enthusiasm of the idea," drew from his axiom of the "indifference of contraries" the practical consequence which is in very deed latent there, that he was ready to sacrifice to the antinomianism, which is certainly a part of its rigid logic, the purities of his youth for instance, there is no proof.

    Giordano Bruno

  • That Bruno himself, in "the enthusiasm of the idea," drew from his axiom of the "indifference of contraries" the practical consequence which is in very deed latent there, that he was ready to sacrifice to the antinomianism, which is certainly a part of its rigid logic, the purities of his youth for instance, there is no proof.

    Giordano Bruno

  • That Bruno himself, in "the enthusiasm of the idea," drew from his axiom of the "indifference of contraries" the practical consequence which is in very deed latent there, that he was ready to sacrifice to the antinomianism, which is certainly a part of its rigid logic, the austerities, the purity of his own youth, for instance, there is no proof.

    Gaston de Latour; an unfinished romance

  • This doctrine is known as antinomianism, the doctrine that the Elect are free of all constraint by laws.

    One Stop Thought Shop

  • This doctrine is known as antinomianism, the doctrine that the Elect are free of all constraint by laws.

    One Stop Thought Shop

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