Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A tree (Pyrus Malus) bearing apples.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But my father once told me the story of an apple-tree that was so laden with apples that its branches could not sing in the wind.

    2009 November

  • ‘My fruits are my best advertisement,’ answered the apple-tree.

    2009 November

  • There was an apple-tree beside the house, and some apples had fallen to the ground.

    Love Letters

  • The apple-dryads drew back a little, regarding Kellen and Shalkan gravely out of dark eyes the color of apple-tree bark.

    Tran Siberian

  • May 28, 1793 – My weeding-woman swept up on the grass-plot a bushel-basket of blossoms from the white apple-tree: & yet that tree seems still covered with bloom.

    Information, Culture, Policy, Education: Weblogs

  • He still had the branch of apple-tree in his hand.

    Les Miserables

  • In one of his preceding lounges he had noticed there an old garden haunted by an old man and an old woman, and in that garden, a passable apple-tree.

    Les Miserables

  • Gavroche directed his steps towards this garden; he found the lane, he recognized the apple-tree, he verified the fruit-house, he examined the hedge; a hedge means merely one stride.

    Les Miserables

  • Beside the apple-tree stood a sort of fruit-house, which was not securely fastened, and where one might contrive to get an apple.

    Les Miserables

  • I call to witness the myrtle, the symbol of love, the laurel, the symbol of air, the olive, that ninny, the symbol of peace, the apple-tree which came nearest rangling Adam with its pips, and the fig-tree, the grandfather of petticoats.

    Les Miserables

Comments

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  • Don't sit under that with anyone else but me.

    April 7, 2009

  • *chews apples*

    April 7, 2009

  • Uhh... is someone trying to say the ancient Greeks never had war? Or just that they sucked at it?

    December 14, 2007

  • "Niebuhr observes that 'the words for a house, a field, a plough, ploughing, wine, oil, milk, sheep, apples, and others relating to agriculture and the gentler ways of life, agree in Latin and Greek, while the Latin words for all objects pertaining to war or the chase are utterly alien from the Greek.' Thus the apple-tree may be considered a symbol of peace no less than the olive." - 'Wild Apples', Henry David Thoreau.

    December 14, 2007

  • "The vine is dried up, and the fig-tree languisheth; the pomegranate-tree, the palm tree also, and the apple-tree, even all the trees of the field, are withered: because joy is withered away from the sons of men." - 'The Bible', (multiple) authors unknown.

    December 14, 2007