Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • interjection slang An imitation of the sound of gagging, used to express disgust or disdain.
  • verb slang To have the vomiting reflex triggered.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For every moment of awe a writer has at seeing her book on a shelf, at being told by readers what comfort they found in your words, come the times when you read the word "blech" in a reader's review.

    Randy Susan Meyers: The Comfort of Bad Reviews (That Aren't Yours)

  • A blech is a fitted sheet of aluminum that is designed to cover two adjacent gas burners.

    SMITH Magazine Superfeed

  • I admit the story was kinda "blech", but the movie was amusing and I liked it.

    Sound Off: The Mummy 3 - What Did You Think? « FirstShowing.net

  • "Someone will mention Albany now and we'll go 'blech'," joked McGonigal, who lives in Clearwater Beach, Fla.

    timesunion.com: Local Breaking News

  • "Someone will mention Albany now and we'll go 'blech'," joked McGonigal, who lives in Clearwater Beach, Fla.

    timesunion.com: Local Breaking News

  • I try not to dismiss things too quickly, but the "blech" reaction is hard to ignore once it kicks in.

    NPR Topics: News

  • I try not to dismiss things too quickly, but the "blech" reaction is hard to ignore once it kicks in.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Now, I'm not saying self-esteem is the reason for the excessive amounts of "blech" in modern entertainment, but when people (such as movie execs) get it in their head that they know what the public needs / wants to see, the art form is in trouble.

    The Daily Barometer

  • April 20th, 2010 6: 26 pm ET blech ... just history repeating itself all over again. the economy is finally starting to stabilize. do i really want republicans back in power to send us back spiraling downward? no. badger

    GOP to unveil campaign pledge after Labor Day

  • The problem is that 95% (at least) of people in that age range grew up with Microsoft products; they think that “operating system” = “MS Windows” (or simply that “computer” = “MS Windows”), that MS Excel is all that is needed for any data management, but that if something beyond that is needed that “MS Access” = “database” [blech].

    Matthew Yglesias » The End of Hierarchical File Systems

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