Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of blood.
  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of blood.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And he beckoned imperiously to a neighbouring group of men, -- "bloods" -- always ready to follow him in a "rag," and heroes together with him of a couple of famous bonfires, in Falloden's first year.

    Lady Connie

  • Where sons of wealthy ranching families tended to be hard-drinking, steak-devouring, woman-chasing "bloods" completely alienated from things of the intellect and spirit, Francisco didn't drink, abstained from meat and believed in arcane mysticism.

    Glorious innocent: the tragedy and triumph of Francisco Madero (1873–1913)

  • Where sons of wealthy ranching families tended to be hard-drinking, steak-devouring, woman-chasing "bloods" completely alienated from things of the intellect and spirit, Francisco didn't drink, abstained from meat and believed in arcane mysticism.

    Glorious innocent: the tragedy and triumph of Francisco Madero (1873–1913)

  • Where sons of wealthy ranching families tended to be hard-drinking, steak-devouring, woman-chasing "bloods" completely alienated from things of the intellect and spirit, Francisco didn't drink, abstained from meat and believed in arcane mysticism.

    Glorious innocent: the tragedy and triumph of Francisco Madero (1873–1913)

  • In their heyday, the Penny Dreadfuls sometimes called "bloods" or "shilling shockers" were produced en-masse.

    Penny Dreadfuls

  • In their heyday, the Penny Dreadfuls sometimes called "bloods" or "shilling shockers" were produced en-masse.

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • He was foremost in every riot, most notorious of all the notorious "bloods" of the day.

    For the term of his natural life

  • ROME, her treatment of conquered Latium, 314; her noble "bloods" lost, 338; she rebukes America, 392.

    History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States

  • One happy illustration of the customs of the sixteenth century was the habit of the barber-surgeon's boy, who amused the customers, waiting for "next turn" to be shaved or bled, with his ballad or rhyming verse; and a boy with a good voice proved a rare draw to the "bloods" about town, and those who frequented the taverns and ordinaries within the City.

    A History of Nursery Rhymes

  • Some of her lady friends and sympathisers had joined her; and a couple of young "bloods" who had come to see the fun of an execution, with money burning holes in their pockets, being captured, the party subsided into the "Bowl" where a bottle of wine washed away the remembrance of Sally Salisbury's grievance.

    Madame Flirt A Romance of 'The Beggar's Opera'

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