Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various boletes of the genus Boletus, including both poisonous species and edible species such as the porcini mushroom.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An extensive genus of hymenomycetous fungi, generally found growing on the ground in woods and meadows, especially in pine woods.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) A genus of fungi having the under side of the pileus or cap composed of a multitude of fine separate tubes. A few are edible, and others very poisonous.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An edible type of mushroom.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun type genus of Boletaceae; genus of soft early-decaying pore fungi; some poisonous and some edible

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin bōlētus, mushroom, of unknown origin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin bōlētus

Examples

  • The package being made for Canada, I decided that the word Jiaozi would be more readily recognized (like the currently popular Italian porcini which is also known as a boletus or cep(e) but that is another story).

    Dumplings of the world, unite!

  • The package being made for Canada, I decided that the word Jiaozi would be more readily recognized (like the currently popular Italian porcini which is also known as a boletus or cep(e) but that is another story).

    Archive 2006-05-01

  • Another enemy of pines is the fungus, especially the white, thread-like spores of the purpled stemmed boletus, which often penetrates and disrupts the bark of the roots, forming a white network upon the roots.

    Beachwood-in-the-Pines « Beachwood Historical Alliance

  • Another enemy of pines is the fungus, especially the white, thread-like spores of the purpled stemmed boletus, which often penetrates and disrupts the bark of the roots, forming a white network upon the roots.

    2008 December « Beachwood Historical Alliance

  • Another enemy of pines is the fungus, especially the white, thread-like spores of the purpled stemmed boletus, which often penetrates and disrupts the bark of the roots, forming a white network upon the roots.

    2008 December 18 « Beachwood Historical Alliance

  • Another enemy of pines is the fungus, especially the white, thread-like spores of the purpled stemmed boletus, which often penetrates and disrupts the bark of the roots, forming a white network upon the roots.

    Beachwood-in-the-Pines « Beachwood Historical Alliance

  • The thickly sliced boletus should go in the pan within a minute or two of the trout being done so they stay almost crunchy.

    Fool’s Paradise

  • The firm, nut-flavored boletus are more blue-collar and not as coveted by connoisseurs, but they go better with brook trout.

    Fool’s Paradise

  • Some suggested mushrooms to use in the broth are coral mushrooms (rumeria rubripermanens), field mushrooms (agaricus campestrus) and ceps (boletus edulis.)

    Wild Mushroom Broth: Caldo de Hongos Silvestres

  • Another enemy of pines is the fungus, especially the white, thread-like spores of the purpled stemmed boletus, which often penetrates and disrupts the bark of the roots, forming a white network upon the roots.

    2008 December 18 « Beachwood Historical Alliance

Comments

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  • "Picking up a boletus bigger than any I'd seen in my life, I hurried back across the tundra to the cabin. Everyone in our party had gone in there to drink tea and vodka and get warm."

    Travels in Siberia by Ian Frazier, p 99

    February 9, 2011