Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A name of the European bass.
  • noun See brass.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A spotted European fish of the genus Lucioperca, resembling a perch.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A spotted European freshwater fish Sander lucioperca, resembling a perch.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Perhaps a transposition of barse; but compare German Brasse the bream, and English bream.

Examples

  • To be precise, a French brasse was six pieds du roi, or 1.06575 English fathoms, which equaled six English feet.

    Champlain's Dream

  • To be precise, a French brasse was six pieds du roi, or 1.06575 English fathoms, which equaled six English feet.

    Champlain's Dream

  • Moi qui suis toujours revolté par tout sans vraiment non plus jouer le rebel et qui suis d'origine tres posé meme quand je suis enervé, je deviens un truc qui brasse de l'air ...

    pinku-tk Diary Entry

  • You will never have post in your pocket unless you have brasse on your plate.

    Finnegans Wake

  • I am flesh and blood, as they are, not made of brasse or iron, and therefore subject to womens frailty. would thou shouldest know it husband, and I tell it thee in good earnest;

    The Decameron

  • “Was not Anubis with his long nose of gold preferred before Neptune, whose STATURE was but brasse?”

    The Second Part of Tamburlaine the Great

  • This boxe when opened was found to carry som manner of brasse plate & suche as I will nott name herein save that Dee hath the same at his house in Mortlake, as I have seen with mine own eyes.

    The Life of the World to Come

  • Hereupon a certain Dominican Frier, determining to make trial of the matter, caused a brasse kettle, & an iron chain to be made: afterward ascending to the top of the hill with 4. other

    A briefe commentarie of Island, by Arngrimus Ionas

  • And after this, they began to discharge the smal pieces of brasse, beginning with the smallest and so orderly bigger and bigger, vntill the last and biggest.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • I haue bene in one of the monasteries called Troietes,222 which is walled about with bricke very strongly like a castle, and much ordinance of brasse vpon the walles of the same.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

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