Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. Check out and contribute to the discussion of this word!

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I see you are very productive, you've published so far many articles on brazzil. com.

    Home

  • Though brazzil. com is not on top this, some national newspapers are.

    Home

  • I am self-appointing myself as the official "brazzil. com" Cucaracha Hunter!

    Home

  • Here is an informative link in case you have not read it: self-appointing the only you can get a job all gas no movement. you think you can control the internet?? or did you buy the brazzil com name to promote your own idea.

    Home

  • February 15, 2009 as usual, brazzil. com is behind on this ... thier article should come out soon

    Home

  • Combined banner prices for brazzil. com and brazzilmag. com (more than 12,000 pages of breaking news - an average of 10 new pages added daily):

    Home

  • Master_Race New Jersey resident David Goldman has been fighting for custody of his son, Sean, brazzil David Goldman thanked God & judge who decided his son should be returned in 48 hs.

    Gaea Times (by Simple Thoughts) Breaking News and incisive views 24/7

  • i would have thought brazzil. com would have been on top of this

    Home

  • c, mon brazzil. com, you are late with any reporting on the italian leftist with asylum in brazil

    Home

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • (noun) - This word, as far as I know, only occurs in the two following phrases. "As hard as a brazzil," is an expression of frequent occurrence to denote any kind of unusual hardness. If, for example, the bread is overbaked it is said to be baked "as hard as a brazzil," or if the housewife cannot break her Bath brick a cake of abrasive clay used for household polishing easily, she exclaims, "It's as hard as a brazzil." The other expression is "as fond as a brazzil." Here the word brazzil probably means a low, impudent girl, in which sense it is sometimes used still. -- Rev. M.C.F. Morris's Yorkshire Folk-Talk, 1892

    February 6, 2018