Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An oil, C8H10O2, with a pleasant odor like that of coffee, obtained in roasting the green coffee-berries. It boils at 196° C. Later observers have failed to obtain the compound.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But when all of the cells are broken, great opportunity is offered for the escape of the caffeol, which is further enhanced by the slight heating which usually accompanies such fine grinding.

    All About Coffee

  • This elusive material has been variously called caffeol, caffeone, "the essential oil of coffee," etc., the terms having acquired an ambiguous and incorrect significance.

    All About Coffee

  • These compounds, which are collectively called "caffeol", vary greatly in the percentages present in different coffees, and thus are largely responsible for our ability to distinguish coffees in the cup.

    All About Coffee

  • The flavor is due largely to the volatile aromatic constituents, "caffeol," which, when isolated, have a general depressant action on the system; and the stimulation is caused by the caffein.

    All About Coffee

  • The absorbing medium is then treated with a solvent of the caffeol, and the solution is separated from the petrolatum.

    All About Coffee

  • The aromatic conglomerate, caffeol, is formed, and a considerable quantity of gas is produced, a portion of which, developing pressure in the cells of the beans, pops, or swells, them so as to increase the size of each individual bean.

    All About Coffee

  • The caffeol supplies the flavor and the aroma -- that indescribable Oriental fragrance that wooes us through the nostrils, forming one of the principal elements that make up the lure of coffee.

    All About Coffee

  • Coffee does not contain any essential oils, the aromatic constituent corresponding to essential oil in coffee being caffeol, a complex which is water-soluble, a property not possessed by any true oil.

    All About Coffee

  • However, upon extraction of ground roasted coffee with water, the caffeol shows a preferential solubility in water, and is dissolved out from the oil, going into the brew.

    All About Coffee

  • In the light of this knowledge, the grind advocated by King [384] seems to be logical, for with it -- though neither a maximum of the non-volatile extractives nor a maximum of caffeol is obtained -- an all-round maximum of cup quality is procured.

    All About Coffee

Comments

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  • A chicory-and-chickpea fake coffee that Italians tried to drink during World War II. Sergio Lepri states that caffè-caffè wasn't available anywhere, not even at the borsa nera.

    January 20, 2009