Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • For this bone (os calcis) is not a small one, protrudes beyond the line of the leg, and is connected with important veins and tendons; for the back tendon of the leg is inserted into this bone.

    On Fractures

  • The latter were four in number: the navicularii, who supplied Rome with provisions, the bakers, the pork butchers, and the calcis coctores et vectores, who supplied Rome with lime for building.

    The Guilds

  • The latter structure, which is chiefly tendinous, originates in the supracondyloid fossa of the femur and has an insertion to the summit of the fibular tarsal (calcis) bone.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • However, where but moderate distension of the sheath exists, there is little, if any, bulging on the mesial side of the hock and but a small hemispherical enlargement is presented on the outer side of the tarsus, anterior to the summit of the os calcis.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • Obliteration of the superficial bursa over the summit of the os calcis is not likely to cause serious inconvenience or distress to the subject unless it be due to an infected wound.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • Extension of the stifle joint would increase the distance between the femoral origin of the gastrocnemius and its insertion to the summit of fibular tarsal bone (calcis) were it not for the gastrocnemius and superficial flexor (perforatus).

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • A wide gauze bandage material is most satisfactory; cotton of long fiber is separated in thin layers and wound about the hock, extending from the site of injury to a point about six inches proximal to the summit of the os calcis.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • Enlargements which occur upon the summit of the os calcis, whether hypertrophy of the skin and subcuticular fascia, the result of injury or repeated vesication, distension of the subcutaneous bursa or injury to the superficial flexor tendon (perforatus) or its sheath, are generally known as capped hock.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • -- This condition though rarely met with in the horse, is the result of violent strain upon the os calcis by the gastrocnemius and superficial flexor tendons in efforts put forth by animals in attempts to regain a footing when the hind feet slip forward under the body, or in jumping and in falls or direct contusion by heavy bodies.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • This arched form of the foot, and the contact of the whole plantar surface with the ground, are particularly noticeable in man, most of the apes having the os calcis small, straight, and more or less raised from the ground, while they touch, when standing erect, with the outer side only of the foot.

    Hygienic Physiology : with Special Reference to the Use of Alcoholic Drinks and Narcotics

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