Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A shirt worn by soldiers over their uniform, in order to be able to recognize one another in a night attack.
  • n. An attack by surprise by soldiers wearing the camisado.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An attack by surprise at night or at break of day: probably so called because made by soldiers wearing shirts over their armor, in order that they might be recognized by their friends in the dark.
  • n. A shirt worn by soldiers over their armor in a night attack to enable them to recognize one another.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ` ` It was a pretty camisade, I doubt not, Ranald MacEagh,

    A Legend of Montrose

  • Nay, was not Andreas in very deed a man of order, courage, downrightness (_Geradheit_); that understood Büsching's _Geography_, had been in the victory of Rossbach, and left for dead in the camisade of Hochkirch?

    Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History

  • Clothes were dispensable from the climate, food only of the lowest quality, and finally the whole were summoned only for one campaign, and usually this was merely a sort of partisan camisade upon a colossal scale, in which the superfluous population of one vast nation threw themselves upon another.

    The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. 2

  • “It was a pretty camisade, I doubt not, Ranald MacEagh, a very sufficient onslaught, and not unworthily discharged.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • "exaggerated despondency" and ends with "hasty exultation," in consequence of a brilliant camisade, wherein Odysseus and Diomede massacre a Thracian contingent.

    Homer and His Age

  • Nestor's, Thrasymedes was sent out, with shield and all, in command of one of the seven companies of an advanced guard, posted between fosse and wall, in case of a camisade by the Trojans, who were encamped on the plain (IX.

    Homer and His Age

  • "It was a pretty camisade, I doubt not, Ranald MacEagh, a very sufficient onslaught, and not unworthily discharged.

    A Legend of Montrose

Comments

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  • "camisade, or camisado, in military transactions, implies an attack by surprise, either during the night, or at break of day, when the enemy are supposed to be in their shirts asleep, or off their guard. The Irish regiment under McGuire, fought in their shirts, and frustrated the attack." (citation in list description)

    October 10, 2008