Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A large grassy plain in South America, with scattered bushes and small trees.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The name given in Brazil to patches of land in the midst of the dense forests of the country which are either entirely bare of trees or are only sparsely covered with them.
  • noun The Italian acre, a measure of land varying in different states from 8/4 of an English acre to 1⅓ acres.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Spanish, field, from Latin campus.]

Examples

  • And he surmised that another term, "the Camp," used to describe the archipelago's barren expanses, is derived from the Spanish word "campo," for countryside.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Gregory, Fortunatus, and the author of the Gesta Francorum, that the battle was fought in campo Vocladensi, on the banks of the

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • (Most of the piazzas in Venice are called campo, meaning "field" in Italian, because they were originally planted with grass and trees.)

    Venice Crossings: A Traghetto Tour Reveals the City's Other Side

  • The silence here in the campo is a rhythmic one, the grasshoppers and other nighttime singers chant some droned out lazy call for the dancing fireflies.

    Archive 2007-10-01

  • The silence here in the campo is a rhythmic one, the grasshoppers and other nighttime singers chant some droned out lazy call for the dancing fireflies.

    NighTime

  • At the bottom of the campo is a shop selling artisanal sweets and local produce.

    Siena

  • At the bottom of the campo is a shop selling artisanal sweets and local produce.

    Archive 2006-12-01

  • At the south of the campo is the Campiello Querini where we find the

    A Wanderer in Venice

  • How surprised I was when, arriving in the place, I discovered that the gravely ill man, who had been waiting for a priest for several days, was Ramon, the one whom they called "el diablo"; a man of the "campo" who had lived a very difficult life.

    Latest Articles

  • * Please note 'door to door' excludes rural 'campo' areas and fincas with 'off road' access.

    thinkSPAIN - The leading English Spanish website

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