Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A bishop's official chair or throne.
  • noun The office or see of a bishop.
  • noun The official chair of an office or a position, as of a professor.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The throne or seat of a bishop in the cathedral or episcopal church of his diocese.
  • noun Hence The official chair of any one entitled or professing to teach with authority, as a professor.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The official chair or throne of a bishop, or of any person in high authority.
  • noun in the exercise of one's office; with authority.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The chair or throne of a bishop.
  • noun The rank of a bishop.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a throne that is the official chair of a bishop

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Latin, chair, from Greek kathedrā : kat-, kata-, cata- + hedrā, seat; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin cathedra ("seat"), from Ancient Greek καθέδρα (kathedra, "chair of a teacher, throne"), from κατά (kata, "down") + ἕδρα (hedra, "seat")

Examples

  • A Christian church building in which a bishop has his official seat (cathedra is Latin for “chair”).

    cathedral

  • A church building in which a Christian bishop has his official seat; cathedra is Latin for “chair.

    cathedral

  • The word cathedra, so expressive in the language of antiquity, has gradually been replaced in liturgical usage, by throne (thronus) or seat (sedes).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • He sat there, as teachers do in cathedra -- in the chair of instruction.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume V (Matthew to John)

  • The chief Church in a diocese is called a Cathedral because the bishop's cathedra, that is, his seat or throne, is erected in it, and because he celebrates all important feasts and performs all his special duties in it.

    Baltimore Catechism No. 3 (of 4)

  • Therefore Peter first sat in that single cathedra, which is the first gift of the Church, to him succeeded Linus … to Damasus, Siricius, who is our contemporary, with whom the world together with us agree in one fellowship of communion by the interchange of letters.

    A Source Book for Ancient Church History

  • Her cathedra was a high arm-chair which she never quitted but to be carried to her observatory on the roof of the house, where she kept her astrological tablets and manuscripts.

    Serapis — Volume 01

  • Her cathedra was a high arm-chair which she never quitted but to be carried to her observatory on the roof of the house, where she kept her astrological tablets and manuscripts.

    Serapis — Volume 01

  • Her cathedra was a high arm-chair which she never quitted but to be carried to her observatory on the roof of the house, where she kept her astrological tablets and manuscripts.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Georg Ebers Works

  • Her cathedra was a high arm-chair which she never quitted but to be carried to her observatory on the roof of the house, where she kept her astrological tablets and manuscripts.

    Serapis — Volume 01

Comments

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  • A few senses, take your pick, and mine is: "an ancient Roman chair used by women, having an inclined, curved back and curved legs flaring outward: the Roman copy of the Greek klismos".

    November 22, 2007