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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A system of characters or symbols used to express or convey thought and meaning.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The art or means of characterizing; a system of signs or characters; symbolism; distinctive mark.
  • n. That which is charactered; the meaning.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The art or means of characterizing; a system of signs or characters; symbolism; distinctive mark.
  • n. That which is charactered; the meaning.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. That which constitutes or indicates character; that in anything which indicates its qualities; a character or characteristic.
  • n. The act or art of characterizing; characterization by means of words or representation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

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  • Wonderful! The image of a poet's work as garners (granaries) holding the grain of thought is found also in Baratynsky's poem "Autumn" (1837), though with different implications:

    But you, as you enter the autumn of your days,
         O plowman of the fields of life,
    and your earthly lot appears before your eyes
         in all its generosity,
    and as the furrows of this life get ready
         to offer up their bounty to you
    and so reward the labor of existence,
         and as the precious harvest ripens,
    and you, in grains of thought, gather it in,
    now at the prime of human destiny—

    are you rich, too, like the tiller of the soil?

    June 13, 2015

  • The beginning of Keats' sonnet "When I Have Fears: "

    When I have fears that I may cease to be 
    Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain,
    Before high-piled books, in charactery,
    Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain;

    June 13, 2015

  • What a lovely word! Here it is in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, where Brutus tells his wife, Portia, that he will soon reveal to her why is worried and pensive:

    And by and by thy bosom shall partake
    The secrets of my heart.
    All my engagements will I construe to thee,
    All the charactery of my sad brows.

    (Act II, scene i)

    June 11, 2015