Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A Turkish tobacco pipe with a long stem and a red clay bowl.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A Turkish pipe having a stiff stem 4 or 5 feet long, usually wound with silk or other thread, which is sometimes wet to cool the smoke by evaporation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A Turkish tobacco pipe.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Turkish dialectal çibuk, from çubuk, shoot, twig, staff, from Old Turkic chubuq, chībīq, diminutive of chīp, chīb-, branch.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Turkish çubuk.

Examples

  • I chose the chibouk, and as the stem of mine was studded with precious stones of enormous value, I thought I should enjoy it the more; but the tobacco being highly flavored with some sort of herbs, my smoke fell far short of my anticipations.

    She Makes Her Mouth Small & Round & Other Stories

  • Tyeglev pondered, heaved a deep sigh and dropping his chibouk out of his hand, informed me that that day was a very important one for him.

    Knock, knock, knock

  • This figure walked straddling its legs and shuffling with its slippers, spoke without taking the chibouk out of its mouth, and behaved with truly

    The Schoolmistress and other stories

  • Imagine a little shaven head with thick overhanging eyebrows, a beak of a nose, long gray mustaches, and a wide mouth with a long cherry-wood chibouk sticking out of it.

    The Schoolmistress and other stories

  • “Truly,” I thought to myself in my dejection and disillusionment, “I cannot be quite grown-up if I cannot smoke as other fellows do, and should be fated never to hold a chibouk between my first and second fingers, or to inhale and puff smoke through a flaxen moustache!”

    Youth

  • I chose the chibouk, and as the stem of mine was studded with precious stones of enormous value, I thought I should enjoy it the more; but the tobacco being highly flavored with some sort of herbs, my smoke fell far short of my anticipations.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • I increased the beauty and conveniences of my dress; I bought a handsome amber-headed chibouk; I girded my waist with a lively-coloured shawl; my tobacco pouch was made of silk, covered with spangles; my slippers were of bright yellow, and I treated myself to a glittering dagger.

    The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan

  • He received me in his usual quiet manner; and when I had related all my misfortunes, he puffed out a long volume of smoke from his never-failing chibouk, and exclaimed, with a deep sigh, ‘_Allah kerim!

    The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan

  • They next went to see Rocjean, in the Corso; they found him in a bournouse, with a fez on his head, a long chibouk in his mouth, smoking away, extended at full length on a settee, which he insisted was a divan.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

  • Here the attendants do everything for the visitor; cut up his _pirog_ (meat, or fish patty), so that he may eat it with his fork; pour out his tea, fill his _chibouk_, and even bring it to him ready lighted.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

Comments

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  • chibouk (chibouc)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (Wordnik has the word "chibouc", undefined.

    An 1838 illustration of a Turkish coffee house with patrons smoking from long-stemmed chibouk pipes, as featured in Travels in the western Caucasus by Edmund Spencer.

    A chibouk (French: chibouque; from the Turkish: çıbuk, çubuk (English: "stick"); also romanized čopoq, ciunoux or tchibouque)1 is a very long-stemmed Turkish tobacco pipe, often featuring a clay bowl ornamented with precious stones. The stem of the chibouk generally ranges between 4 and 5 ft. (1.2 and 1.5 m), much longer than even Western churchwarden pipes. While primarily known as a Turkish pipe, the chibouk was once popular in Iran, as well.

    (seen in story by Edgar Allen Poe)

    (comment copied from CarlosG's list)

    July 22, 2013