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Examples

  • No man is valianter than he is in civil company, and where he thinks no danger may come on it, and is the readiest man to fall upon a drawer and those that must not strike again: wonderful exceptious and cholerick where he sees men are loth to give him occasion, and you cannot pacify him better than by quarrelling with him.

    Microcosmography or, a Piece of the World Discovered; in Essays and Characters

  • And here is an older and a better – "From a cholerick man withdraw a little: from him that saies nothing, for ever."

    Try Anything Twice

  • I know that admonition is very seldom grateful, and that authors are eminently cholerick; yet, I hope, that you, and every impartial reader, will be convinced, that I intend the benefit of the publick, and the advancement of knowledge; and that every reader, into whose hands this shall happen to fall, will rank himself among those who are to be excepted from general censure.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 05 Miscellaneous Pieces

  • Percy is a rugged soldier, cholerick and quarrelsome, and has only the soldier's virtues, generosity and courage.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 05 Miscellaneous Pieces

  • Piercy is a rugged soldier, cholerick, and quarrelsome, and has only the soldier's virtues, generosity and courage.

    Preface to Shakespeare

  • I. i.82 (230,5) [young squarer] A _squarer_ I take to be a cholerick, quarrelsome fellow, for in this sense Shakespeare uses the word to _square_.

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

  • _Lord Grizzle_, extremely zealous for the | liberty of the subject, very cholerick in his | Mr JONES. temper, and in love with Huncamunca.

    The Works of Henry Fielding Edited by George Saintsbury in 12 Volumes $p Volume 12

  • A surly cholerick Fellow generally makes Choice of a Bear; as Men of milder

    Spectator, April 2, 1711

  • Strephon appears by his Letter to be a very cholerick Lover, and irrevocably smitten with one that demurrs out of Self-Interest.

    Spectator, June 12, 1711

  • -- Hor. I HAVE observed, that a Reader seldom peruses a Book with Pleasure 'till he knows whether the Writer of it be a black or a fair Man, of a mild or cholerick Disposition, Married or a Batchelor, with other Particulars of the like nature, that conduce very much to the right Understanding of an Author.

    Spectator Pop-up Footnote

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