Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of several trees and shrubs of the genus Cinchona, native chiefly to the Andes and cultivated for bark that yields the medicinal alkaloids quinine and quinidine, which are used to treat malaria.
  • noun The dried bark of any of these plants.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any of several South American trees, of the genus Cinchona, cultivated for its medicinal bark.
  • noun The bark of these trees, that yields quinine alkaloids used to treat malaria.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[New Latin Cinchona, genus name, reputedly after Francisca Henríquez de Ribera (1576–1639), Countess of Chinchón.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Named (by Linnaeus) after the Countess of Chinchón, who was cured of a fever by the bark while in Peru and brought a supply of it back to Europe.

Examples

  • The name cinchona is derived from that of the wife of a viceroy of Peru, who is said to have taken the drug from South America to Europe in

    Catalogue of Economic Plants in the Collection of the U. S. Department of Agriculture

  • This explains the fact that the above-named branches of science all possess an extensive literature on cinchona, which is accessible for purposes of comparison to those who care to study the subject in detail.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • On the coasts of New Andalusia, the cuspa is considered as a kind of cinchona; and we were assured, that some Aragonese monks, who had long resided in the kingdom of New Grenada, recognised this tree from the resemblance of its leaves to those of the real Peruvian bark-tree.

    Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America

  • On the coasts of New Andalusia, the cuspa is considered as a kind of cinchona; and we were assured, that some Aragonese monks, who had long resided in the kingdom of New Grenada, recognised this tree from the resemblance of its leaves to those of the real

    Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America, During the Year 1799-1804 — Volume 1

  • Fortunately, the group was traveling through the very region that is home to the fabled cinchona tree—the "fever tree," as the natives called it—whose bark is the source of quinine, used as a treatment.

    An Expedition Without End

  • Fortunately, the group was traveling through the very region that is home to the fabled cinchona tree—the "fever tree," as the natives called it—whose bark is the source of quinine, used as a treatment.

    An Expedition Without End

  • Powdered bark from the cinchona tree, found only on the eastern slopes of the Peruvian Andes, contained alkaloids that checked malaria.

    Malarial mosquitoes helped defeat British in battle that ended Revolutionary War

  • But because of cultural differences and a dearth of long-range radio transmitters those initiatives also ended up being small-time, such as fake surrender orders from their commanders dropped on Japanese troops in Burma or rumors spread that their quinine, which comes from the cinchona, was made from the worthless bark of other trees.

    Wild Bill Donovan

  • Powdered bark from the cinchona tree, found only on the eastern slopes of the Peruvian Andes, contained alkaloids that checked malaria.

    Malarial mosquitoes helped defeat British in battle that ended Revolutionary War

  • But because of cultural differences and a dearth of long-range radio transmitters those initiatives also ended up being small-time, such as fake surrender orders from their commanders dropped on Japanese troops in Burma or rumors spread that their quinine, which comes from the cinchona, was made from the worthless bark of other trees.

    Wild Bill Donovan

Comments

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  • Source of quinine

    July 18, 2007

  • also known as Jesuit's bark

    December 14, 2009