Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Dated form of collie. (dog breed)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See collie.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See collie.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His eyes glittered, his mouth worked convulsively, and his cheeks were as black with the flying soot as the "colley" of the pot.

    The Manxman A Novel - 1895

  • I fancy the poor dog seems to feel the monstrosity of the performance, and, in sheer shame for his master, forgivingly tries to assume it is PLAY; and I have seen a little "colley" running along, barking, and endeavoring to leap and gambol in the shafts, before a load that any one out of this locality would have thought the direst cruelty.

    The Twins of Table Mountain

  • Yes, you read right "colley" is an old world meaning

    WIBW - HomePage - Headlines

  • The wild people are more humane; they pay two ewes for a good colley, and demand a two-year-old sheep as

    First footsteps in East Africa

  • Certainly the shepherd's colley has been admirably individualized by the Ettrick

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 25, November, 1859

  • It was not until the house-colley went up to sniff at him and he stooped to pat its head that it flashed on me the stranger was the shepherd-lad who had befriended me in my weary tramp across Ayrshire.

    The Narrative of Gordon Sellar Who Emigrated to Canada in 1825

  • Mr. B---- has a dear colley with whom he carries on long conversations, particularly on the subject of the coolness of the morning and the water in his bath; so you see we have plenty of animal life about.

    A Lady's Life on a Farm in Manitoba

  • He is hunted with dogs, generally resembling a cross between the greyhound and the colley of the

    Life of Schamyl And Narrative of the Circassian War of Independence Against Russia

  • A light damask curtain is found to have been saturated with port wine; a ditto chair-cushion has been doing duty as a dripping-pan to a cluster of wax-lights; a china shepherdess, having been brought into violent collision with the tail of a raging lion on the mantel-piece, has reduced the noble beast to the short-cut condition of a Scotch colley.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, November 6, 1841,

  • Scotch colley, -- a lean, wrinkled, dark-faced woman, who is unwinding the bandages from a squalling _Bambino_, -- a mixed odor of garlic and of goats, that is quickened with an ammoniacal pungency, -- and you may form some idea of the home of a small Roman farmer in our day.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 70, August, 1863

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