colliquation

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of melting; fusion; a melting or fusing together.
  • noun In old medicine, a wasting away of solid parts, accompanied by an excessive excretion of fluids.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A melting together; the act of melting; fusion.
  • noun (Med.), obsolete A processive wasting or melting away of the solid parts of the animal system with copious excretions of liquids by one or more passages.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of becoming liquid; melting.
  • noun medicine The wasting-away of parts of the body; consumption.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Moschio the physician said, that putrefaction was a colliquation of the flesh, and that everything that putrefied grew moister than before, and that all heat, if gentle, did stir the humors, though not force them out, but if strong, dry the flesh; and that from these considerations an answer to the question might be easily deduced.

    Symposiacs

  • Moschio the physician said, that putrefaction was a colliquation of the flesh, and that everything that putrefied grew moister than before, and that all heat, if gentle, did stir the humors, though not force them out, but if strong, dry the flesh; and that from these considerations an answer to the question might be easily deduced.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Fire is the cause of induration, but respective to clay; fire is the cause of colliquation, but respective to wax.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • But fire is no constant cause either of induration or colliquation; so then the physical causes are but the efficient and the matter.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • They shall be deprived of all their strength of body and mind (v. 17): All hands shall be feeble, so that they shall not be able to fight, or defend themselves, and all knees shall be weak as water, so that they shall neither be able to flee nor to stand their ground; they shall feel a universal colliquation: their knees shall flow as water, so that they must fall of course.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume IV (Isaiah to Malachi)

  • The colliquation of his spirits: My heart is like wax, melted to receive the impressions of God's wrath against the sins he undertook to satisfy for, melting away like the vitals of a dying man; and, as this satisfied for the hardness of our hearts, so the consideration of it should help to soften them.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume III (Job to Song of Solomon)

  • Fire is the cause of induration, but respective to clay; fire is the cause of colliquation, but respective to wax.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • But fire is no constant cause either of induration or colliquation; so then the physical causes are but the efficient and the matter.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • On the fame day, or the day following, fuch parts of the fauces as at firft feemed to be of a deeper colour than the reft, turned white, afii-coloured, or black: this was not occafioned by any cruft or matter fuper - induced upon the parts, but proceeded from a gangrenous colliquation of them, the fub* ftance itfelf being mortified.

    A Complete Collection of the Medical and Philosophical Works of John Fothergill

  • There was not only a colliquation of his body in his sufferings (Ps. xxii.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume IV (Isaiah to Malachi)

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • "2. In old medicine, a wasting away of solid parts, accompanied by an excessive excretion of fluids." --Cent. Dict.

    June 29, 2011