Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To be on friendly or intimate terms with someone.
  • intransitive verb To consult or confer with someone.
  • intransitive verb To chat.
  • intransitive verb Chiefly Upper Southern US To conspire; intrigue.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To use flattery; gloze; flatter.
  • To confer or converse confidentially and secretly; plot mischief; lay schemes in concert.
  • To wheedle; flatter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb Archaic or Colloq. To talk or confer secretly and confidentially; to converse, especially with evil intentions; to plot mischief.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To talk privately or secretly; to conspire

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb confer secretly

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Perhaps alteration (influenced by Latin colloquī, to converse) of colleague, to enter into an alliance, from Old French colleguer, from Latin colligāre, to collect (influenced by Old French collegue, colleague); see colligate.]

Examples

  • "collogue," as they expressed it; but also the little gossoons in their ragged trousers and bare feet, and the girleens, with their curly hair, and roguish dark-blue eyes, to scuttle in also.

    Light O' the Morning

  • But first I want to swing it back to my collogue Mary Snow, who is up in Michigan.

    CNN Transcript Jan 13, 2008

  • [5189] They will crack, counterfeit, and collogue as well as the best, with handkerchiefs, and wrought nightcaps, purses, posies, and such toys: as he justly complained,

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • [86] Heretofore learning was graced by judicious scholars, but now noble sciences are vilified by base and illiterate scribblers, that either write for vainglory, need, to get money, or as Parasites to flatter and collogue with some great men, they put cut [87] burras, quisquiliasque ineptiasque.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Their means is their misery, though they do apply themselves to the times, to lie, dissemble, collogue and flatter their lieges, obey, second his will and commands as much as may be, yet too frequently they miscarry, they fat themselves like so many hogs, as [3696] Aeneas

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • The two would collogue for hours; and though at first I did not understand the tongue, I could see that it was the white man who fawned and the black man who bullied.

    Prester John

  • Now the artful young rogue, while they held their collogue

    A Bush Christening

  • At night I see the two hold a sort of a collogue abaft the wheel, when I was on my trick at the helm.

    The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 1, August 1850 of Literature, Science and Art.

  • The two would collogue for hours; and though at first I did not understand the tongue, I could see that it was the white man who fawned and the black man who bullied.

    Prester John

  • They were fit company, '' he added, ` ` for each other, Sir Rashleigh having lost all right to mingle in the society of men of honour; but it was hardly possible two such d--- d rascals should collogue together without mischief to honest people. ''

    Rob Roy

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • goodness! i love this word. I want to use it to refer to a conversation between secret lovers.

    May 23, 2009

  • Some private exchanges are fraught
    As innocent converse is not.
    In voices that collogue
    Hear treachery's prologue,
    The reptilian hiss of a plot.

    August 9, 2016

  • If you insist on rhyming fraught as, well, frot

    My ears are far tinner than I thot.

    Das veirdness uft speech

    Makes my aurals go 'bleeeeccch'

    Or perhaps I was just poorly tot?

    August 10, 2016

  • My goodness! How do they say this in Hobart? Frafft? Frackit?

    Go to the site pasted below and hear some audio examples.

    http://www.memidex.com/fraught#audio

    It must be the effect of hanging bat-like from the bottom of the planet.

    August 10, 2016

  • Some communications are definitely fraught
    when pronunciation is a mere afterthought
    so warm up yer dingo
    to learn some DownUnder lingo
    and make words sound like they bloody well ought!

    August 10, 2016