Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A flat, pear-shaped drinking vessel with loops for attachment to the belt of the user.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A bottle of leather, earthenware, or wood, having ears by which it was suspended at the side.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A bottle of leather, earthenware, or wood, having ears by which it was suspended at the side.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A flask, flagon, or bottle; specifically, such a vessel of leather, wood, or earthenware, often of a flattened form, and generally with ears by which it may be suspended, used by British laborers in harvest-lime. Sometimes called pilgrim's bottle.

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French costerel, possibly from costier, at the side, from coste, rib, from Latin costa.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Compare Welsh costrel, Old French costrel, Latin costrellum, a liquid measure, costrellus a wine cup. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And, behold! the maiden came back, and a youth with her, bearing on his back a costrel full of good purchased mead and a quarter of a young bullock.

    The Mabinogion Vol. 2 (of 3)

  • And, behold! the maiden came back, and a youth with her, bearing on his back a costrel full of good purchased mead, and a quarter of a young bullock.

    The Mabinogion

  • And, behold, the maiden came back, and a youth with her, bearing on his back a costrel full of good purchased mead, and a quarter of a young bullock.

    The Age of Fable

Comments

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  • "And, behold, the maiden came back, and a youth with her, bearing on his back a costrel full of good purchased mead, and a quarter of a young bullock."
    - Thomas Bulfinch, 'Age of Fable'.

    September 19, 2009

  • a flask vessel made of earthenware, leather, or wood that is attachable to one's belt/waist by ears (hoops) on one or both sides of the vessel.

    Originated around 1350-1400s

    October 2, 2007