Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A food fish (Brosme brosme) of North Atlantic coastal waters that is related to the cod.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A local name in Great Britain of the torsk, a fish of the genus Brosmius, and in the United States of the burbot, Lota maculosa.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A large, edible, marine fish (Brosmius brosme), allied to the cod, common on the northern coasts of Europe and America; -- called also tusk and torsk.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A marine cod-like fish in the ling family Lotidae, Brosme brosme.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun large edible marine fish of northern coastal waters; related to cod
  • noun elongate freshwater cod of northern Europe and Asia and North America having barbels around its mouth
  • noun the lean flesh of a cod-like fish of North Atlantic waters

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Probably alteration of tusk.]

Examples

  • As is the case with most of the detached ridges in this gulf, the cusk is the most abundant of the fish present about the middle of March. continuing in good numbers through May.

    Fishing Grounds of the Gulf of Maine

  • Today cod and its closest family members—Atlantic pollock, cusk (which is sold as scrod), haddock, hake (also sold as whiting)—are far less plentiful and more likely to be eaten fresh.

    One Big Table

  • There has been a recent increase in landings of less utilized species such as monkfish, cusk, white hake, and skate.

    Scotian Shelf large marine ecosystem

  • Using these localities we will investigate the effects of topography and currents on the distribution of the fauna, and the effects of varying organic input in two different biogeochemical settings....and last night they had their trawls and cameras over the side and it's worth clicking over see what they found and make the pudgy cusk eel's acquiaintance.

    Hello Pudgy Cusk Eel

  • Using these localities we will investigate the effects of topography and currents on the distribution of the fauna, and the effects of varying organic input in two different biogeochemical settings....and last night they had their trawls and cameras over the side and it's worth clicking over see what they found and make the pudgy cusk eel's acquiaintance.

    Archive 2007-08-01

  • Cod and cusk are found here in the spring and fall; haddock from October to January, inclusive.

    Fishing Grounds of the Gulf of Maine

  • This is not a hake ground, although there are a few cusk to be had here on the deeper parts and an occasional small halibut is taken in the kelp on the shoal in June and July.

    Fishing Grounds of the Gulf of Maine

  • Thus, if a given area appears as a larger ground than is shown upon other charts made for navigating purposes, often this is because we have included in it a cusk ground or

    Fishing Grounds of the Gulf of Maine

  • Apparently no large number of cusk or hake are taken here on the ridge, perhaps because the water is not deep enough for the former, except for the small fish, which are of little value to the fishermen; and the ground is not muddy enough for the latter species.

    Fishing Grounds of the Gulf of Maine

  • Cod and cusk are taken in the spring, haddock in May and June. and hake in summer.

    Fishing Grounds of the Gulf of Maine

Comments

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  • "In gadiform fish, evolution is seen in the fins. The cusk has almost a continuous single fin around the body with a barely distinct tail. The ling has a distinct tail and a small second dorsal fin. On a hake, the forward dorsal fin becomes even more distinct. On a whiting, there are three dorsal fins, and the anal (belly) side has developed two distinct fins. On the most developed gadiforms—cod, haddock, and pollock—these three dorsal fins and two anal fins are large and very separate."

    —Mark Kurlansky, Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World (New York: Penguin, 1997), 38

    July 14, 2009