Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun organic chemistry A particular isoflavone.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Soybeans contain a naturally occurring compound called daidzein that certain bacteria living within the human digestive tract can metabolize, or convert, into S-equol

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Phytoestrogens are natural plant substances found in food that exert weak estrogen-like activity toward mammals, such as daidzein, genistein and glycitein found in soybeans and soy products, coumestrol in mung bean and alfalfa sprouts and resveratrol in grape skins and red wine.

    NutraIngredients-USA RSS

  • Genistein decreased mammary tumor growth by 33 percent while daidzein increased it by 38 percent when compared with placebo.

    Craig Cooper: Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

  • In the October 2010 issue of Clinical and Experimental Metastasis, researchers reported on the effects of soy isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, and combined soy isoflavones) in established cancers in mice.

    Craig Cooper: Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Comments

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  • See: equol

    November 18, 2008