deconstruction love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words; and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meanings: "In deconstruction, the critic claims there is no meaning to be found in the actual text, but only in the various, often mutually irreconcilable, 'virtual texts' constructed by readers in their search for meaning” ( Rebecca Goldstein).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a philosophical theory of textual criticism; a form of critical analysis
  • n. The destroying or taking apart of an object; disassembly.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A philosophical theory of criticism (usually of literature or film) that seeks to expose deep-seated contradictions in a work by delving below its surface meaning. This method questions the ability of language to represent a fixed reality, and proposes that a text has no stable meaning because words only refer to other words, that metaphysical or ethnocentric assumptions about the meaning of words must be questioned, and words may be redefined in new contexts and new, equally valid and even contradictory meanings may be found. Such new interpretations may be based on the philosophical, political, or social implications of the words of a text, rather than solely on attempts to determine the author's intentions.
  • n. the process of criticising or interpreting a text by the method of deconstruction{1}.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The undoing of what has been constructed or done.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a philosophical theory of criticism (usually of literature or film) that seeks to expose deep-seated contradictions in a work by delving below its surface meaning

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

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  • "It seems like in both usages, "dismantle" would work pretty well. "

    But @Chained_Bear, no... in the Derridean sense, 'deconstruction' implies not a taking-apart but a proving of elements of an argument to be inherently contradictory or false.

    Similarly, as @rolig mentions, taking a house apart is dis-assembling, not deconstructing.

    June 14, 2011

  • Disassemble.

    April 4, 2009

  • It seems like in both usages, "dismantle" would work pretty well.

    April 3, 2009

  • I often come across the same problem in my editing. One of the people I work with (a Slovene artist) occasionally will refer to to deconstructing buildings, when what she means is pulling them down. I try to explain that the only way to deconstruct a building is to theorize about it (or perhaps build a new construction that in some way analyzes, questions and exposes the underlying structure of the first building). The problem becomes more interesting because my colleague also discusses in her work the deconstruction of modernism, and here, of course, she is talking about deconstruction.

    April 3, 2009

  • Hum. I've just encountered this word referring to what workers did to a building at the World Trade Center site. I'm tempted to leave it in for its disturbing Baudrillardian quality, but I'm afraid duty requires me to substitute something more prosaic. Dismantling, perhaps.

    April 3, 2009

  • A philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words; and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meanings: “In deconstruction, the critic claims there is no meaning to be found in the actual text, but only in the various, often mutually irreconcilable, ‘virtual texts’ constructed by readers in their search for meaning�? (Rebecca Goldstein).

    December 2, 2008