Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete A bank; a dike.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete A bank; a dike.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French. See dike.

Examples

  • In Dinard and St Lunaire, Point Passion Plage digue de L'Ecluse, Dinard, +33 2 9988 1520, pointplage.fr provides kayak, catamaran and windsurf lessons and rentals.

    Classic France: the insiders' guide

  • Tambours sur la digue, sous forme de pièce ancienne pour marionnettes jouée par des acteurs.

    Ariane Mnouchkine.

  • Gavroche, that is mon dogue, ma dague et ma digue, a slang expression of the Temple, which signifies my dog, my knife, and my wife, greatly in vogue among clowns and the red-tails in the great century when Moliere wrote and Callot drew.

    Les Miserables

  • At each end of the _digue_, between it and the main land, are broad ship-channels, affording a free passage at all tides to the largest ships.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 73, November, 1863

  • There is a fine digue and raised broad walk all along the sea front, with flowers, seats, and music stand.

    Chateau and Country Life in France

  • Near the Casino there are a quantity of old-fashioned ramshackly bathing cabins on wheels, with very small boys cracking their whips and galloping up and down, from the digue to the edge of the water, on staid old horses who know their work perfectly -- put themselves at once into the shafts of the carriages -- never go beyond a certain limit in the sea.

    Chateau and Country Life in France

  • Then stretching away towards the greeny-blue coast-line is the long line of digue or causeway on which one may see a distant puff of white smoke, betokening the arrival of the early train of the morning.

    Normandy, Illustrated, Part 3

  • Then stretching away towards the greeny-blue coast-line is the long line of digue or causeway on which one may see a distant puff of white smoke, betokening the arrival of the early train of the morning.

    Normandy, Illustrated, Complete

  • It was a great centre for smuggling and privateering, the fleet brought many hangers-on, and the building of the great digue drew thither rough toilers who could find, or were fitted for, no other employment.

    Carette of Sark

  • We made a comfortable, though not very quick, passage, the wind falling slack and fitful at times, so that it was the evening of the next day before we slipped in under the eastern end of the great digue they were building for the protection of the shipping in the harbour.

    Carette of Sark

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.