Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A usually round pin that fits tightly into a corresponding hole to fasten or align two adjacent pieces.
  • n. A piece of wood driven into a wall to act as an anchor for nails.
  • transitive v. To fasten or align with dowels: table legs that are doweled to the top.
  • transitive v. To equip with dowels.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pin, or block, of wood or metal, fitting into holes in the abutting portions of two pieces, and being partly in one piece and partly in the other, to keep them in their proper relative position.
  • n. A wooden rod, as one to make short pins from.
  • n. A piece of wood or similar material fitted into a surface not suitable for fastening so that other pieces may fastened to it.
  • v. To fasten together with dowels.
  • v. To furnish with dowels.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A pin, or block, of wood or metal, fitting into holes in the abutting portions of two pieces, and being partly in one piece and partly in the other, to keep them in their proper relative position.
  • n. A piece of wood driven into a wall, so that other pieces may be nailed to it.
  • transitive v. To fasten together by dowels; to furnish with dowels.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A wooden or metallic pin or tenon used for securing together two pieces of wood, Stone, etc.
  • n. A piece of wood driven into a wall to receive nails of skirtings, etc.; a dook.
  • To fasten together, as two boards, by pins inserted in the edges: as, to dowel pieces which are to form the head of a cask. Sometimes written dowl.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a fastener that is inserted into holes in two adjacent pieces and holds them together

Etymologies

Middle English doule, part of a wheel, perhaps from Middle Low German dovel, plug, or from Old French doele, barrel stave (diminutive of douve, from Late Latin doga, vessel, from Greek dokhē, recepticle, from dekhesthai, to take.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

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